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I have 3 tables as follows,

1. Link_products_price
DESC: unique_id|product_id|sub_category_id.
2. local_price
DESC: unique_id|price.
3. online_price
DESC: unique_id|price.

I want to select the lowest price for a given product_id|sub_category_id.

I came up with the following,

Approach 1:

SELECT MIN(price) 
FROM local_price 
WHERE unique_id IN (SELECT unique_id 
                    FROM link_products_price 
                    WHERE product_id=1 
                    AND sub_category_id=1) 

UNION 

SELECT MIN(price) 
FROM online_price 
WHERE unique_id IN (SELECT unique_id 
                    FROM link_products_price 
                    WHERE product_id=1 
                    AND sub_category_id=1) 
LIMIT 1;

Approach 2 :

Create a VIEW with an INNER JOIN on these 3 tables and query MIN(price) from the view when it is required from the application.

But then, view would execute the query only during run time.

Please tell me whether the query in approach 1 is OK or if it can be further optimized and advice on the VIEW approach too.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

Your first approach always selects the minimum local price: you'd need to add an ORDER BY clause to ensure the minimum of the two is selected by the LIMIT. However, it would be simpler to join the queries and use MySQL's LEAST() function in combination with MIN() aggregation:

SELECT LEAST(MIN(local_price.price), MIN(online_price.price))
FROM   link_products_price
  LEFT JOIN  local_price USING (unique_id)
  LEFT JOIN online_price USING (unique_id)
WHERE link_products_price.product_id = 1
  AND link_products_price.sub_category_id = 1
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the reply. Can I politely request you to explain to me about the good things in this query?. In a way I understand LEFT JOIN's necessity in this scenario. Instead of blindly copying and pasting the query I want to know, why? because next time I will write it myself. Thanks again. –  beck03076 Jun 3 '12 at 7:47
    
@beck03076: Outer joins are only necessary (versus inner ones) in case there are no matching records in the price tables; although, that said, in such a situation LEAST() will result in a NULL value so outer joins actually don't add much here at all and you could simply dispose of the LEFT keywords. PS, the word "join" in my answer is a link to a good tutorial on joins. –  eggyal Jun 3 '12 at 7:52
    
Thank you so much man. –  beck03076 Jun 3 '12 at 7:58

In terms of efficiency (not readability) I'd probably go with something similar to your first example, except that your example contains an error - you assume the UNION sorts the results?

Try this corrected version instead:

SELECT LEAST(

    (SELECT MIN(price) 
     FROM local_price 
     WHERE unique_id IN (SELECT unique_id 
                         FROM link_products_price 
                         WHERE product_id=1 
                         AND sub_category_id=1))
    ,
    (SELECT MIN(price) 
     FROM online_price 
     WHERE unique_id IN (SELECT unique_id 
                         FROM link_products_price 
                         WHERE product_id=1 
                         AND sub_category_id=1))
)

But unless you have hundreds of millions of rows you'll probably find that the query goes so fast even if you use a less efficient method that it doesn't matter which is fastest.

The most important thing to get efficiency is to make sure that you have the appropriate indexes.

I'd suggest adding the following indexes:

  • link_products_price (product_id, sub_category_id)
  • local_price (unique_id , price)
  • online_price (unique_id , price)
share|improve this answer
    
I heard joins are faster than sub-queries. Can I benchmark your answer and eggyal's answer?. What is the best way to benchmark mysql queries? Thank you so much for your answer. –  beck03076 Jun 3 '12 at 7:52
1  
@beck03076: "I heard joins are faster than sub-queries." Sometimes, but that doesn't mean it's always true. "Can I benchmark your answer and eggyal's answer?" I don't know! I know that I can, but I don't know if you can. Try it and let us know! "What is the best way to benchmark mysql queries?" Try running both on your data. Chances are that both will be so fast that it doesn't matter. Or both will be slow because you didn't add indexes. The most important thing for improving performance is adding appropriate indexes. Just in case you missed it: INDEXES!!! –  Mark Byers Jun 3 '12 at 7:54
    
Thank you so much, man. –  beck03076 Jun 3 '12 at 7:56
1  
A join is sometimes faster than subqueries. But this has only subqueries that return 1 row each. And your other way has 2 LEFT joins. I would bet that this wat would be most performant - even better if the two IN were rewritten with INNER JOIN. –  ypercube Jun 4 '12 at 7:26

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