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I am using underscore.js library has a clone method.

var newObject = _.clone(oldObject);

I read from one of the comments that it's a shallow clone. I want to make a clone of an object and pass it to different functions.

When i alter the newObject which is inside the function A(), i get the following results...

{
    'Des': 'Some Des'
    'Des1': 4,
    'Des2': {
        "ChildDes": 0,

    },
},

But when i pass the newObject which is the clone object to an another function B(), i get alert value as [Object,Object]. Why? I am not able to print the value like this..

function B(newObject){
   alert(newObject.Des2);
}
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2  
well the alert does not know how to handle the object use the console.log for that. If you want the result you have to use alert(newObject.Des2.ChildDes). But your title question is what's the shallow copy, from the underscore doc you can read: "Any nested objects or arrays will be copied by reference, not duplicated." –  Risto Novik Jun 3 '12 at 8:52
2  
A "shallow copy" is a copy, that just copies all members. If one of the members is a reference to an object, than changes on the copied reference will effect the original one. A "deep copy" will copy the objects too. Deep copies are sometimes hard to achieve since an objects member could have a reference on the object itself. TL;DR: Play a little bit with different copy styles. See also: stackoverflow.com/questions/1749581/… –  Zeta Jun 3 '12 at 8:59
    
@Zeta: That ought to be an answer rather than a comment. :) –  cHao Jun 3 '12 at 9:06
    
@cHao: I assume I tend to underestimate my thoughts and post them as comments lately (see stackoverflow.com/questions/10863022/…) :D. –  Zeta Jun 3 '12 at 10:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A "shallow copy" is a copy, that just copies all members. If one of the members is a reference to an object, than changes on the copied reference will effect the original one. A "deep copy" will copy the objects too, so that changes on deep copied elements won't effect the original object. Deep copies are sometimes hard to achieve since an objects member could have a reference on the object itself.

Play a little bit with different copy styles and see for yourself what can happen. See also: What does it mean to clone() an object?

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The terms "shallow copy" and "deep copy" are not used consistently and should, IMHO be avoided. I would suggest that instead cloning operations should be divided into three categories:

  1. The behavior of a public cloning method for something whose purpose is to hold various objects (e.g. `SuperDuperList`) should be to create a new instance of the original type, which holds the same instances as the original, but is detached from it. Nothing which is done to the original or cloned object should affect the identities of the things the other object exists to hold. Note that while a `SuperDuperList` might have some private fields of type `T[]`, the purpose of a `SuperDuperList` isn't to hold arrays of `T`, but rather to hold instances of `T`. Thus, a proper cloning method for a `SuperDuperCollection` would have to replace any mutable arrays with new arrays that held the same `T` instances as the original's, but are detached from them. Some people refer to this type of copy as a "shallow copy", but some use that term for the #2 "broken copy" semantics below. Some call it "deep copy", but some--including myself--would restrict that term to usage #3. I prefer the term "semantic-level copy".
  2. Some broken cloning methods leave both the original and cloned objects both holding reference to a shared object which is, from the perspective of the original object, mutable. Note that from the perspective of a `SuperDuperList`, a storage location of type `T` does not hold a reference to a possibly-mutable object `T`, but rather holds the immutable identity of a `T`. On the other hand, if a `SuperDuperList` has a field which holds a reference to an array of `T`, and that array will ever be mutated, a cloning method which let both the original and cloned object keep a reference to the same array would be broken.
  3. Some cloning methods require that the objects held by the object being cloned must meet certain special criteria so that they themselves can be cloned (most typically, every property of every nested object must either be immutable or provide a cloning method). In some cases, a collection of such objects might not know exactly what the objects are or what their cloning methods actually do; if the semantics of a collection's cloning operation go deeper than its understanding of the objects stored therein, such a collection is deeply cloneable.

A normal pattern for a derived object's cloning method should be to start by cloning its parent, and then clone any fields which hold references to outside objects which hold the things the object being cloned is supposed to hold, and which cannot be relied upon to hold those same things forever. If every derived class follows that pattern, proper semantic-level cloning will be achieved.

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