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Initializing in constructors, best practice?
Advantages of using initializer list?

I have the following two ways to define the constructor in the Point Class :

class Point
{
public : 
    Point(double X,double Y):x(X),y(Y){}

Private : 
double x,y;


}

Another way :

class Point
{
public : 
 Point(double X,double Y)
{    
   x= X;
   y = Y;

}

Private : 
double x,y;


}

I want to know which one is better and why?Is there is the use of copy ctor in the first case? Where each one is preferred?Can some explain with the example? Rgds, Softy

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marked as duplicate by dirkgently, Pubby, juanchopanza, Nicol Bolas, jamesdlin Jun 3 '12 at 9:46

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The second version does an assignment to the data members, whereas the first initializes them to the given values. The first version is preferred here. Although it may make little difference in the case of doubles, there is no reason at all to prefer a construction that performs extra operations. If your data members were not doubles, but types that are expensive to construct, you would be paying the penalty of default constructing them, and then assigning a value to them.

Example:

struct ExpensiveToConstruct { .... };

struct Foo {
  Foo() {
    // here, x has already been default constructed
    x = SomeValue; // this is an assignment to the already constructed x.
  }
  ExpensiveToConstruct x;
};

struct Bar {
  Bar : x(SomeValue) {
    // only the constructor has been called. No assignemt.
  }
  ExpensiveToConstruct x;
};
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1  
"Although it may make little difference in the case of doubles" - does it make any difference? –  Luchian Grigore Jun 3 '12 at 9:36
    
@LuchianGrigore there is an extra assignment, so I think it makes a (negligible) difference. –  juanchopanza Jun 3 '12 at 9:38
    
But in the first case there is an extra initialization. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 3 '12 at 9:39
    
See 6th paragraph - parashift.com/c%2B%2B-faq-lite/ctors.html#faq-10.6 –  Luchian Grigore Jun 3 '12 at 9:40
1  
They aren't guaranteed equivalent, but I don't see any reason why they shouldn't be. After all, on the assembler level, there is no RAII: for a POD object, you first allocate a bunch of unititialised memory and then start to write stuff in it, regardless of whether this is an initialisation or an assignment in the C++. –  leftaroundabout Jun 3 '12 at 11:08

Use initializer lists when possible. Although in this particular case it makes no difference, you'll get in the habit.

For POD types, the members don't get initialized twice so performance-wise it's the same thing. non-POD types are initialized before entering the constructor body, so they'll be initialized twice if you don't do it in the initializer list but in the body of the c-tor.

const members and references must be initialized in the initializer list. Again, doesn't apply to your case.

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Better to use initialize list in your ctor. It would be more efficient. In your 2nd way, ctor will initialize member data twice, with default value 1st, and then invoke statement in ctor.

and more, for const or reference member, should be initialized by init lists, cannot be initialized in ctor.

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2  
POD types are not initialized twice. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 3 '12 at 9:38

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