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I'm working on one of my course projects, and I need a matrix of nxn, where the first pxp of it contains ones and rest are zeros. I can do it with traversing the cells, so I'm not asking a way to do it. I'm looking for the "MATLAB" way to do it, using build in functions and avoiding loops etc. To be more clear,

let n=4 and p=2,

then the output must be:

1 1 0 0
1 1 0 0
0 0 0 0
0 0 0 0

I know there are possibly more than one elegant solution to do it, so I will accept the answer with the shortest and most readable one. The question title looks a bit irrevelant, but I thought that the best strategy is to create pxp ones matrix, then expanding it to nxn with zeros.

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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The answer is creating a matrix of zeroes, and then setting part of it to 1 using indexing:

For example:

n = 4;
p = 2;
x = zeros(n,n);
x(1:p,1:p) = 1;

If you insist on expanding, you can use:

padarray( zeros(p,p)+1 , [n-p n-p], 0, 'post')
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padarray( ones(p,p) , [n-p n-p], 0, 'post') is also working, thanks for teaching me padarray function. –  Seçkin Savaşçı Jun 3 '12 at 11:23
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Another way to expand the matrix with zeros:

>> p = 2; n = 4;
>> M = ones(p,p)
M =
     1     1
     1     1
>> M(n,n) = 0
M =
     1     1     0     0
     1     1     0     0
     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0
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You can create the matrix easily by concatenating horizontally and vertically:

n = 4;
p = 2;
MyMatrix = [ ones(p), zeros(p, n-p); zeros(n-p, n) ];
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>> p = 2; n = 4;
>> a = [ones(p, 1); zeros(n - p, 1)]

a =

     1
     1
     0
     0

>> A = a * a'

A =

     1     1     0     0
     1     1     0     0
     0     0     0     0
     0     0     0     0
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