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Since all the high level language program are translated into assembly language by the compiler and then the assembler convert it to the machine language code.
and since there is a single specific assembly language for specific processor, so all the different types of high level language code ultimately convert into that specific assembly language code.

so is there a single assembler in single processor computer?

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3 Answers 3

Since all the high level language program are translated into assembly language by the compiler and then the assembler convert it to the machine language code.

This is not necessarily correct. It is entirely possible and practical to go directly from high-level language to machine-code (i.e. binary representation). No need to invoke a separate application.

since there is a single specific assembly language for specific processor

This is not correct. There is a single instruction set for a specific processor, but there may be multiple assembler applications, each with their own syntax (see e.g. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X86_assembly_language#Syntax).

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All processors with the same instruction set architecture speak the same language, and they all understand code from the same assembler.

So there is one assembler for a single-processor computer, or a multicore computer, or all the x86 computers on the planet. (Of course, there may be many assemblers to choose from, but they all convert to the same binary program format.)

The assembler is just one of the final stages of a compiler.

so is there a single assembler in single processor computer?

An assembler is just a piece of software that you can install or remove. It is not essential except for software development resulting in native binaries to be distributed.

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Generally compilers compile down to assembler, but that is not always the case some go straight to machine code (tcc), and some go to bytecode (python, java) which requires a virtual machine to go the last mile.

Sometimes you will find only one assembler, but generally you will find multiple to many assemblers. Each assembler has a reason it was created vs just using an existing one. Sometimes there is a change to the assembly language (gnu likes to mess up assembly language when it implements gas for a target), sometimes the differences are the directives, the stuff that isnt necessarily machine code, or the output formats, object vs a ready to run binary, etc.

Normally the processor inventor/vendor will invent an assembly language, and to peddle their product often create an assembler and sometimes compiler, or at least create a modification to an existing retargettable one. Sometimes charging a lot/too much, sometimes giving it away for free. free or pay-for compiler vendors and the open source world may choose to still do their own thing.

the common denominator though is machine code, not assembly language, and the machine code a processor understands is well defined and doesnt matter what original language the programs were written in.

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