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Why this code doesn't work? echo get('option_1') returns null.

$settings= array(
    'option_1' => 'text'
);

function get($name)
{
    if ($name)
        return $settings[$name];
}

echo get('option_1');
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closed as too localized by Juhana, tereško, PeeHaa, hakre, vascowhite Jun 3 '12 at 13:53

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10  
Please read the documentation: php.net/manual/en/language.variables.scope.php (second example). –  Felix Kling Jun 3 '12 at 12:55
    
haha, thanks. Forgot about scope. –  Jasper Jun 3 '12 at 12:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The simple solution is to make $options be a global variable inside get():

function get($name)
{
    global $options;
    if ($name)
        return $options[$name];
}

If you don't like global state, make $options as an argument to get() (but then it's just syntactic sugar...):

function get($name, $options)
{
    if ($name)
        return $options[$name];
}
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6  
Never do global.. –  meze Jun 3 '12 at 12:59
    
meze, agreed, that's why I've updated the answer. –  Emil Vikström Jun 3 '12 at 13:00
    
global in PHP is not like global in other language, with that in mind I would to enlighten myself why Never do global? –  anubhava Jun 3 '12 at 13:05
1  
anubhava, it's usually hard to maintain code with a lot of global state. It's easier to encapsulate it in objects. I do not totally agree with the "never do X" sentiment - it can be useful to do X in some situations - but you should think twice about introducing global state in most programs. global in PHP basically means that the function will work on more data than is provided to the function, which is very similar to global state. –  Emil Vikström Jun 3 '12 at 13:08
1  
s/never do X/try to avoid X, and if you do X anyway make sure you know why and what the alternatives to X would be/ –  Emil Vikström Jun 3 '12 at 13:13

Because $options is out of the scope of the get function. You either have to:

  1. Pass $options along with $name as a function parameter
  2. Declare $options as global variable (very bad idea)
  3. use $options as an internal class variable and access it with $this->options (only works inside a class)
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global in PHP is not like global in other language, with that in mind I would to enlighten myself why global in PHP is very bad idea? –  anubhava Jun 3 '12 at 13:06

The $options is not in the scope of your get function.

An object oriented solution:

class Options
{
  private static $options = array(
    'option_1' => 'text',
  );

  public static function get($name)
  {
    return isset(self::$options[$name]) ? self::$options[$name] : null;
  }
}

echo Options::get('option_1');
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