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Here's my code:

  template <typename DataType> bool SearchValue(TreeNode<DataType> *root, DataType search_value)
{
    if(search_value != root->data)
    {
        if(root->right != NULL)
        {
            return SearchValue(root->right, search_value);
        }
        if (root->left != NULL)
        {
            return SearchValue(root->left, search_value);
        }
        return false;
    }
    else
    {
        return true;
    }
}

I can't make SearchValue function work properly. The condition is not to change the signature of SearchValue function. The problem is following: for example we try to find the element with data field equals "90" and it exists in the tree. Sometimes this code finds this element and sometimes not - depending on it's position in the tree. The question is how to make it work right every time.

I build the tree in such way:

template <typename DataType> TreeNode<DataType> *BuildTree()
{
    TreeNode<DataType> *root = new TreeNode<DataType>(10, new TreeNode<DataType>(20), new TreeNode<DataType>(30));

    TreeNode<DataType> *curRoot = root;
    curRoot = curRoot->left;
    curRoot->left = new TreeNode<DataType>(40);
    curRoot->left->left = new TreeNode<DataType>(70);
    curRoot->right = new TreeNode<DataType>(50);
    curRoot = curRoot->right;
    curRoot->left = new TreeNode<DataType>(80, new TreeNode<DataType>(100), new TreeNode<DataType>(110));
    curRoot = root->right;
    curRoot->left = new TreeNode<DataType>(60);
    curRoot = curRoot->left;
    curRoot->right = new TreeNode<DataType>(90, new TreeNode<DataType>(120), new TreeNode<DataType>(130));

    return root;
}

I test the search this way:

TreeNode<int> *treeRoot = BuildTree<int>();
    int valueToFind = treeRoot->data;
    cout << "Enter the value you'd like to find in the tree: ";
    cin >> valueToFind;
    cin.get();
    if(SearchValue(treeRoot, valueToFind) == true)
    {
        cout << "Value " << valueToFind << " was found!";
    }

The way I implement the tree:

template <typename DataType> struct TreeNode
{
    TreeNode(DataType val, TreeNode<DataType> *leftPtr = NULL, TreeNode<DataType> *rightPtr = NULL)
    {
        left = leftPtr;
        right = rightPtr;
        data = val;
    }
    TreeNode<DataType> *left, *right;
    DataType data;
};
share|improve this question
    
Can you tell us the problem you've hit with your implementation? Examples would be nice. –  dirkgently Jun 3 '12 at 13:31
2  
-1 emilvikstrom.se/whyidownvote.html (What is your question? What have you tried?) –  Emil Vikström Jun 3 '12 at 13:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change

if(root->right != NULL)
{
    return SearchValue(root->right, search_value);
}
if (root->left != NULL)
{
    return SearchValue(root->left, search_value);
}
return false;

to

if(root->right != NULL)
{
    if (SearchValue(root->right, search_value))
        return true;
}
if (root->left != NULL)
{
    if (SearchValue(root->left, search_value))
        return true;
}
return false;

The way you currently have it, it will always go down the right branch and return if it was found there, never checking the left branch.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a point. Thanks a lot! –  Sergey Shafiev Jun 3 '12 at 14:16
    
This is O(n), kinda defeating the point of a binary tree, no? –  Puppy Jun 4 '12 at 1:24
    
@DeadMG: Not all binary trees are binary search trees. It doesn't look like a binary search tree (root's value is less than both its left and right value), so I've just solved the immediate problem he had. It actually looks like a binary min heap, so O(n) search would be correct. –  Peter Alexander Jun 4 '12 at 12:02

The current search will always follow the right branch if it exists (and then never follow the left branch). If the data is ordered in the tree (which is typical), the code should examine the root node to make a decision on whether to traverse left or right.

share|improve this answer

You can clearly tell that the code is wrong, because you never perform a comparison. Therefore, by default, the code cannot be correct.

You need to compare to decide which branch to go down, not simply test for existence.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't agree with you, the comparison is represented by the following fragment: if(search_value != root->data) –  Sergey Shafiev Jun 3 '12 at 14:12
    
@Sergey: That's not a < comparison. That only tells you if you're there- not what direction to go in. –  Puppy Jun 4 '12 at 1:08

Just as Peter Alexander said, you cannot return on right-branch, the only return condition is equal and return true, for else condition, need continue left-branches.

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