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I have a directory root:

index.php
includes/
    template.php
    testfile.php
    phpFiles/
        processInput.php
        testfile.php

index.php:

require_once("includes/template.php");

template.php:

require_once("includes/phpFiles/processInput.php")

processInput.php:

require_once("testfile.php")
require_once("../testfile.php")

This code will work when you run index.php, of course it will not work when you run template.php.

As you can see, index.php includes template.php like normal. But in template.php, you have to include like if you are in the directory that index.php is in. But then, in processInput.php, you include as if you are in the directory that processInput.php is in.

Why is this happening, and how can I fix it so that the include path is always the directory of the file that the require is done in? The second included file have the same include path as the requested file, but the next one does not.

Thanks for your help!

EDIT: The strange thing is that I've included classes in a class folder. And it included other files as it is supposed to, even though the paths are relative. WHY does this happen, and how can I fix it?

VERY IMPORTANT EDIT: I just realized that all this is because in my example, the inclusion in includes/phpFiles/processInput.php includes a file in the same directory: require_once("file in same dir.php"); This is the reason. If you are including a file with out specifying anything more than the filename, the include_path is actually the dir where the file the require is written in is in. Can anyone confirm this?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this in a few ways, amongst others:

  1. Use set_include_path to control the directories from where to perform require() calls.

  2. Define a common absolute base path in a constant that you define in index.php and use that in every require() statement (e.g. require(BASEPATH . '/includes/template.php')).

  3. Use relative paths everywhere and leverage dirname(__FILE__) or __DIR__ to turn them into absolute paths. For instance: require(__DIR__ . '/phpFiles/processInput.php');

By default, the current working directory is used in the include path; you can verify this by inspecting the output of get_include_path(). However, this is not relative to where the include() is made from; it's relative to the main executing script.

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I've added an edit. –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 13:59
    
@StudentofHogwarts those classes you have seen probably leverage my point #3 –  Jack Jun 3 '12 at 14:01
    
I've added a very important edit! –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 20:37
    
@StudentofHogwarts updated my answer; basically, you've misunderstood the include system ;-) –  Jack Jun 4 '12 at 2:03
    
So include_path is the include path of the main script only. :) –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 5 '12 at 11:48
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Use an absolute path.

require_once($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']."/includes/phpFiles/processInput.php");

Use a similar form for all your required files and they will work no matter where you are.

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Yes, it will. I just want to be able to do it relatively. One reason is that it should be easily transferable. –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 13:56
    
The strange thing is that I've included classes in a class folder. And it included other files as it is supposed to, even though the paths are relative. –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 13:57
    
Since $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'] always exists no matter what server you're on, there should be no problem. The only issue is if this is for some kind of app that is not in the document root, in which case you'll have to define a constant that tells the script where the root of your app is. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jun 3 '12 at 13:58
    
I've added an edit. –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 13:59
    
I've added a very important edit! –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 20:38
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index.php:

require_once("includes/template.php");

template.php:

require_once("includes/phpFiles/processInput.php")

Your directory structure is off. The file inclusion is being seen from the file you're using it from. So, "template.php" is looking for an "includes/" folder in its current folder (/includes/).

As others are saying, use absolute paths, which will make sure you're always going at it from the file system root, or use:

require_once("phpFiles/processInput.php")

In your template.php file (which is far more likely to break if you ever move things around, which is why others all recommend using absolute paths from the file system root).

BTW, if you're using "index.php" as some kind of framework system, you can consider defining a variable that stores the address of common files such as:

define('APPLICATION_PATH', realpath(dirname(__FILE__));
define('PHPFILES_PATH', APPLICAITON_PATH . '/includes/phpFiles/');
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I've added a very important edit! –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 20:37
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You're using relative paths. You need to use absolute paths: $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT'].

When you include/require, you are basically temporarily moving all code from one file, to another.

so if file1.php (which is located in root) contains:

require("folder/file.php");

and you include file1.php in file2.php (which is in a different location (say folder directory for example):

file2.php:

require("../file1.php");

Now all of file1.php code is in file2.php. So file2.php will look like this:

require("../file1.php");
require("folder/file.php");//but because file2.php is already in the `folder` directory, this path does not exist...
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Why do I need to use absolute paths? –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 13:56
    
I've added an edit. –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 13:59
    
check my edit. xD –  user849137 Jun 3 '12 at 14:06
    
You wrote: require("folder/file.php");//but because file2.php is already in the folder directory, this path does not exist... –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 20:20
    
But if you in file2.php include a file3.php, that file will not follow that rule. It will include the way I want it to do. –  Student of Hogwarts Jun 3 '12 at 20:20
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