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I'm working on the port of a C#/directx game client to Java, so that I can learn some C# (as I am completely profane on it) and in the meanwhile improve my knowledge on a java opengl engine.

When I encounter something like the following:

Monitor.Enter(preloadDictionary);
try {
     foreach (PreloadEntry entry in preloadDictionary.Values) {
         if (entry.loaded) continue;
         return entry;
     }
} finally {
     Monitor.Exit(preloadDictionary);
}

can i assume it is like the following?

syncronized(preloadDictionary) {
     [...]
}

And in the case of:

Monitor.Enter(worldServerMap);
try {
     worldServerMap[rv.WorldName] = entry;
     Monitor.PulseAll(worldServerMap);
} finally {
     Monitor.Exit(worldServerMap);
}

is the additional PulseAll() like a notifyAll() to wake up all thread waiting on the resource? (but i could not find any place in the code where Monitor.Wait() is called).

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Yes and yes. In C#, it is also more typical to use "lock (preloadDictionary)", which is a shorthand for the Monitor.Enter(...); try...finally { Monitor.Exit(...);} block you described. –  Alan Jun 3 '12 at 14:45
    
@Alan: this should be an answer. –  JB Nizet Jun 3 '12 at 17:02
1  
@JBNizet: well, I'm not quite sure about the missing Monitor.Wait() part, so this doesn't constitute an answer by my standards, but still wanted to give a quick feedback to the OP. –  Alan Jun 3 '12 at 18:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

lock(x) is itentical to Monitor.Enter then Monitor.Exit in the finally. It is a langauge shortcut.

If you ask me, it is one of the weaker parts of the C# language - simply because while it was nice while there was a MINOTIR, these days there are various versions of monitors (slim, spinlock etc.) and lock only supports one of them. It is convenient, but I am not sure it is wise ;)

is the additional PulseAll() like a notifyAll() to wake up all thread waiting on the resource? (but i could not find any place in the code where Monitor.Wait() is called).

The PulseAll makes little sense unless you have an explicit wait, possibly from other threads not wanting to Enter. Enter waits if it can not get a lock, so Exit is enough to make normal synchronization.

I would start looking for a Wait or something else - PulseAll on a MOnitor makes only sense if you have threads waiting WITHOUT trying to Enter at this stage. It could lead to a bad design issue that basically has them waiting then get pulsed then try to enter, it could be part of a non blocking design of some dsort - hard to say, but it is unusual. Unless you can find a Wait somewhere in your code, I would likely try killing the PulseAll and see what happens.

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