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This is my simple markup:

<select id="firstSelect">
 <option value="1">one</option>
 <option value="2">two</option>
 <option value="3">three</option>
</select>
<select id="secondSelect"></select>

In my js there are three different arrays with a progressive name, like these:

var arrayColours1 = new Array('yellow', 'blue');
var arrayColours2 = new Array('red', 'grey');
var arrayColours3 = new Array('white', 'black');

Now I want to popolate the second select with values inside one of the array, according to the selected option of the first select, in this way:

$('#firstSelect').change(function(){
var selectedValue = $(this).children('option:selected').val();
var elem = 'arrayColours'+ selectedValue;
$.each(elem, function (index, value) {
        $('<option/>').val(value).html(value).appendTo('#secondSelect');
    });
});

But this doesn't work beacuase of course elem now is a string. How can solve this issue, concatenating 'arrayColours' with a suffix and making it a variable for call the name of an array? Thank you so much in advance for your attention, any help will be strongly appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's easier than you think.

var colourArray = {
   set1: ["yellow", "blue"],
   set2: ["red", "gray"],
   set3: ["white", "black"]
};

When you need a concrete set of colours just do this:

clourArray["set" + selectedValue]

Associative arrays are your way to go!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Matìas but for specific reasons I can't use associative array. I read of "window" property, can you help me with this? Thank you so much. – bobighorus Jun 5 '12 at 18:18

It would be better if your variables passed into an array.

var arrayColours = [
  ['yellow', 'blue'],
  ['red', 'grey'],
  ['white', 'black']
];

$('#firstSelect').change(function(){
 var selected = this.value;
 $.each(arrayColours[selected-1], function(index, value) {
    $('<option/>').val(value).html(value).appendTo('#secondSelect');
 });
});

or, you can also use object like following:

var arrayColours = {
  one: ['yellow', 'blue'],
  two: ['red', 'grey'],
  three: ['white', 'black']
};

and then

   $('#firstSelect').change(function(){
     var selected = $('option:selected', this).text();
     $.each(arrayColours.selected, function(index, value) {
        $('<option/>').val(value).html(value).appendTo('#secondSelect');
     });
    });
share|improve this answer
    
As I asked in other questions in SO, I can never understand why - if you're not a PHP developer - JavaScript code should use a single quot to declare string literals. – Matías Fidemraizer Jun 3 '12 at 16:20
    
Thanks @tecodeparadox but for specific reasons I can't use associative array. I read of "window" property, can you help me with this? Thank you so much. – bobighorus Jun 5 '12 at 18:17

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