Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using boost::asio, and I have code like this:

void CServer::Start(int port)
{ 
    tcp::acceptor acceptor(m_IoService, tcp::endpoint(tcp::v4(), port));

    for ( ;; )
    {
    	shared_ptr<tcp::socket> pSocket(new tcp::socket(m_IoService));

    	acceptor.accept(*pSocket);

    	HandleRequest(pSocket);
    }
}

This code works, but I'd like to switch to using Acceptor::async_accept so that I can call Acceptor::cancel to stop receiving requests.

So my new code looks like this:

void CServer::StartAsync(int port)
{ 
    m_pAcceptor = shared_ptr<tcp::acceptor>( new tcp::acceptor(m_IoService, tcp::endpoint(tcp::v4(), port)) );

    StartAccept();
}

void CServer::StopAsync()
{
    m_pAcceptor->cancel();
}

void CServer::StartAccept()
{
    shared_ptr<tcp::socket> pSocket(new tcp::socket(m_IoService));

    m_pAcceptor->async_accept(*pSocket, bind(&CServer::HandleAccept, this, pSocket));	
}

void CServer::HandleAccept(shared_ptr<tcp::socket> pSocket)
{
    HandleRequest(pSocket);

    StartAccept();
}

But this code doesn't seem to work, my function CServer::HandleAccept never gets called. Any ideas? I've looked at sample code, and the main difference between my code and theirs is they seem often make a class like tcp_connection that has the socket as a member, and I'm not seeing why thats necessary.

  • Alex
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Ah, looks like to kick things off you need to run the IOService, e.g.:

m_IoService.run();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.