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I am having trouble understanding how to use the DataContractSerializer in WCF REST

I am using a channel factory like so:

 Uri uri = new Uri("http://localhost:50000/people");
        WebChannelFactory<IPersonService> chFactory = new WebChannelFactory<IPersonService>(uri);

 IPersonService iPerson = chFactory.CreateChannel();

than can call the channel methods directly from the channel like this

 List<Person> allPeople = new List<Person>();
 allPeople = iPerson.getAll();

This has what I got so far as how to use the DataContractSerializer so I can output the response

MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
<--------------- how to i read iPerson.getAll() into stream? --------->                        
XmlDictionaryReader reader = XmlDictionaryReader.CreateTextReader(stream, new XmlDictionaryReaderQuotas());
DataContractSerializer dcs = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(Person));
List<Person> allpeople2 = (List<Person>)dcs.ReadObject(reader, true);
reader.Close();
stream.Close();

I am not exactly sure how to put these pieces together to make it all work.

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1 Answer 1

I think you made it a bit complicated...

i would start a new project following this introduction page: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/dd315413.aspx

When you configure the serialization issues on web.config, you just have to declare attributes on your interfaces / classes and you don't have to write a single line of serializing / deserializing code for your objects (unless you need to get customized serialization which in your case not needed)

by the url provided "http://localhost:50000/people", i assumed you are looking for a RESTful service, so just in case you need some more advanced features you can look at that as well: https://github.com/mikeobrien/WcfRestContrib

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