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I am using CodeBlocks and I have the following code which does not compile.

(It is about some C++ pitfalls so the only thing I want to ask is why it does not compile)

The code is as follows:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Shape
{
        public:
                Shape();
                virtual void reset();
        private:
                int color;
};

class Point : public Shape
{
        private:
        double a,b;
};

void Shape::reset()
{
        cout<<"Shape reset\n";
}

void Point::reset()
{
        Shape::reset();
        cout<<"Point reset";
}

Shape::Shape()
{
        reset();
}

int main()
{
        Shape s;
        Point o;
}

I get the following error:

no `void Point::reset()' member function declared in class `Point'
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2 Answers 2

You need to add a declaration of the function to your Point class body:

class Point : public Shape
{
public:
    virtual void reset();
private:
    double a,b;
};

(The virtual is unnecessary, because it's declared virtual in the base class. But it's helpful to add it as a reminder.)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh thanks.I though that it works directly by extending Point from Shape but now I see that it doesn't. –  delegat Jun 3 '12 at 18:21
    
@delegat - The main reason why you need to declare overrides is call optimization. The compiler often knows the exact type of an object, and in that case it optimizes away VMT access (calls the method directly rather than virtually). But if the implementation of Point::reset was only visible in its own the compilation unit, this would result in erroneous calls to Shape::reset on Point objects from other compilation units that would know about Point but not about Point::reset. –  Jirka Hanika Jun 3 '12 at 18:23

It should be declared like this instead:

class Shape
{
       public:
               Shape();
               virtual void reset(){};
       private:
               int color;
};

Notice the brackets, since the virtual function does nothing, you can just add the brackets in the declaration. Since it is a virtual function it is designed to be redefined when inheriting the base class. So can't really call Shape::reset() in your Point::reset() function. Also in your Point class, you need to redefine the new function. Like this:

class Point : public Shape
{
     public:
         void reset();
}

then you can use the function as Point::reset.

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