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If I've got the function below, with two choices

private MyObject findBlank() {
    for (int i = 0; i < pieces.length; i++) {
        if(pieces[i].isBlank()){
            return pieces[i];
        }
    }
    return null;
}

private MyObject findBlank() {
    for (int i = 0; i < pieces.length; i++) {
        if(pieces[i].isBlank()){
            return pieces[i];
        }
    }
    throw new NoSuchFieldError("No blank piece found!");
}

From this method I know that it should always return an object one of the 'pieces' always is isBlank() == true , the return null at the end is just to please the compiler. Since this is the case and my code wouldn't work anyway if it returned null, is this the correct please to throw an exception?

My options are:

  1. return null and the app will get a NullPointerException in some edge case
  2. return null and wrap the use of the method with (myObject != null) checks
  3. throw an exception which will blow it up at runtime

I guess what I'm asking is, is this the correct place to throw an exception? i.e. there is nothing I can do about it if it gets into the situation. Is this classed as 'exceptional' or should I null check what my method returns (which makes my code look horrible). If I know it shouldn't return null then I should throw the exception right?

Also how would I choose what exception, or extend one and throw my own?

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To help choose an exception: wuhrr.wordpress.com/2007/11/22/java-exceptions-list –  Blundell Jun 3 '12 at 20:21
    
Is the "neither" suggestion not attractive? :-) –  missingfaktor Jun 3 '12 at 22:56
    
@missingfaktor I'm coding in Android so can't bring in other heavy frameworks –  Blundell Jun 3 '12 at 23:06
    
Understood. For what it's worth, this particular abstraction is not all that heavy, and you can add only the required part if you find it useful. –  missingfaktor Jun 4 '12 at 5:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

About your options, ask yourself if

  1. Is it a good idea to have your program blow up at some point after this method returned an unexpected value (i.e. null)?
  2. What exactly will be hidden if you mask out the null return value?
  3. Is it a good idea to blow up immediately, just because there was a wrong value?

Personally I'd go for option 2 or 3, depending on whether I like the answer to question 2 or 3 better. Option 1 definitely is a bad idea, especially if it's not supposed to happen. If the program throws a NPE way after your function returned, you'll have a hard time figuring out where the null came from. Especially if it happens months after you finished working on this particular function.

If you choose to throw an exception, you immediately see where something went wrong and you can directly go there to figure out why it went wrong. Returning null and checking for it in the calling function could also work, but only if you don't fail silently, but actually do something to handle the problem properly.

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I guess what I'm asking is, is this the correct place to throw an exception?

If it were an exceptional situation, then yes. If the possibility of not finding anything that matches the criteria is expected then the situation is not exceptional and you should return null.

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Yes, you should throw a RuntimeException to indicate an "exceptional" situation that should not have occurred. IllegalStateException probably fits the bill. Make sure to include a message with any information that will help you find the bug if it is ever thrown.

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I'm not sure I agree with the "cannot recover" part. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 3 '12 at 20:00
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels - How do you recommend it should be phrased? –  Paul Bellora Jun 3 '12 at 20:02
    
I would remove the "from which your program cannot recover" part. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 3 '12 at 20:15

should always return an object or return null
and
the app will get a NullPointerException in some edge case
those two are contradictory.

If you are really sure that you alwasy have pieces[i].isBlank() then throw IllegalStateException

Otherwise handle the case according your requirements.

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if you array should always have a valid value to return, you should raise an exception as a fallback. (2sd case in your example)

Eventually, you can declare your own kind (Class) of exception.

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I would suggest using Maybe (also known as Option) data type that I just talked about in another answer a while ago.

This data type is available in Functional Java.

Usage:

private Option<MyObject> findBlank() {
    for (int i = 0; i < pieces.length; i++) {
        if(pieces[i].isBlank()){
            return Option.some(pieces[i]);
        }
    }
    return Option.none();
}

Sidenote:

Your findBack method can be generalized to a method that takes a predicate as an argument, and finds and returns the first element that satisfies it.

Unsurprisingly, Functional Java already has that as well.

Let's assume for a moment that pieces is a fj.data.List. Then your method can be rewritten as:

private Option<MyObject> findBlank() {
  return pieces.find(new F1<MyObject, Boolean>() {
    public Boolean f(MyObject p) {
      return p.isBlank();
    }
  });
}

Another sidenote:

Perhaps the above code looks pretty gnarly. IntelliJ IDEA's "closure folding" can be of some help here.

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Find more meat here. –  missingfaktor Jun 3 '12 at 20:26

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