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In Java is it possible to write a switch statement where each case contains more than one value? for example (though clearly the following code don't work, else I won't be asking this):

switch(num){
case 1 .. 5:
    System.Out.Println("testing case 1 to 5");
    break;
case 6 .. 10:
    System.Out.Println("testing case 6 to 10");
    break;
}

I think this can be done in Objective C, are there a similar thing in Java? Or should I just use if, else if statements instead?

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There even extensions in plain C that allow for this. –  arshajii Sep 28 '13 at 1:07
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7 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Java has nothing of that sort. Why not just do the following?

public static boolean isBetween(int x, int lower, int upper) {
  return lower <= x && x <= upper;
}

if (isBetween(num, 1, 5)) {
  System.out.println("testing case 1 to 5");
} else if (isBetween(num, 6, 10)) {
  System.out.println("testing case 6 to 10");
}
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How come the return type is static? Shouldn't it be boolean instead? –  Synia Jun 3 '12 at 21:02
    
@Synia, yes, left it out by mistake. Corrected now. –  missingfaktor Jun 3 '12 at 21:04
    
This works great and is simple. Also if you want to select numbers not in the range all you need is if(!isBetween... , good job. –  digiholic Jul 20 '13 at 13:43
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The closest you can get to that kind of behavior with switch statements is

switch (num) {
case 1:
case 2:
case 3:
case 4:
case 5:
     System.out.println("1 through 5");
     break;
case 6:
case 7:
case 8:
case 9:
case 10:
     System.out.println("6 through 10");
     break;
}

Use if statements.

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I don't think you can do that in Java. Best bet is to just put the code in the last case of the range.

switch (num) {
  case 1: case 2: case 3: case 4: case 5: 
     System.Out.Println("testing case 1 to 5");
     break;
  case 6: case 7: case 8: case 9: case 10:
     System.Out.Println("testing case 6 to 10");
     break;
  default:
     //
}
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other alternative is using math operation by dividing it, for example:

switch ((int) num/10) {
    case 1:
        System.out.println("10-19");
        break;
    case 2:
        System.out.println("20-29");
        break;
    case 3:
        System.out.println("30-39");
        break;
    case 4:
        System.out.println("40-49");
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

But, as you can see this can only be used when the range is fixed in each case.

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It's possible to group several conditions in the same case statement using the mechanism of fall through allowed by switch statements, it's mentioned in the Java tutorial and fully specified in section §14.11. The switch Statement of the Java Language Specification.

The following snippet of code was taken from an example in the tutorial, it calculates the number of days in each month (numbered from month 1 to month 12):

switch (month) {
    case 1: case 3: case 5:
    case 7: case 8: case 10:
    case 12:
        numDays = 31;
        break;
    case 4: case 6:
    case 9: case 11:
        numDays = 30;
        break;
    case 2:
        if (((year % 4 == 0) && 
             !(year % 100 == 0))
             || (year % 400 == 0))
            numDays = 29;
        else
            numDays = 28;
        break;
    default:
        System.out.println("Invalid month.");
        break;
}

As you can see, for covering a range of values in a single case statement the only alternative is to list each of the possible values individually, one after the other. As an additional example, here's how to implement the pseudocode in the question:

switch(num) {
    case 1: case 2: case 3: case 4: case 5:
        System.out.println("testing case 1 to 5");
        break;
    case 6: case 7: case 8: case 9: case 10:
        System.out.println("testing case 6 to 10");
        break;
}
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No you can't do that. The best you can do is that

case 1:
case 2:
case 3:
case 4:
case 5: 
  System.Out.Println("testing case 1 to 5");
break;
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You could use an enum to represent your ranges,

public static enum IntRange {
  ONE_TO_FIVE, SIX_TO_TEN;
  public boolean isInRange(int v) {
    switch (this) {
    case ONE_TO_FIVE:
      return (v >= 1 && v <= 5);
    case SIX_TO_TEN:
      return (v >= 6 && v <= 10);
    }
    return false;
  }

  public static IntRange getValue(int v) {
    if (v >= 1 && v <= 5) {
      return ONE_TO_FIVE;
    } else if (v >= 6 && v <= 10) {
      return SIX_TO_TEN;
    }
    return null;
  }
}
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