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I've built a UI widget that allows me to create a set of nested rules. For example, I could specify the following rules:

Match ALL of these rules
  - Document Status == Open
  - Has Tag = 'sales'
  - Has Tag = 'question'
  - Match ANY of these rules
    - Has Tag = 'important'
    - Has Tag = 'high-priority'
    - Has Tag = 'critical-priority'

In english, this would translate to this query:

Find Documents where status = Open AND has tag 'sales' AND has tag 'question' 
    AND has at least one of these tags: 'important', 'high-priority', 'critical-priority'

The table structure looks similar to this.

Documents {id, title, status}
Tags {document_id, tag_value}

Now, at this point I need to translate this set of rules in to an SQL query. It can be done fairly easily using subqueries, but Id rather avoid them because of performance reasons. The Documents and tags table could potentially contain millions of records each.

SELECT 
    d.id
FROM
    Documents d
WHERE
    d.status = 'open'
    AND EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Tags t WHERE t.doc_id = d.id AND t.value = 'sales') 
    AND EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Tags t WHERE t.doc_id = d.id AND t.value = 'question') 
    AND (
        EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Tags t WHERE t.doc_id = d.id AND t.value = 'important')
        OR EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Tags t WHERE t.doc_id = d.id AND t.value = 'high-priority')
        OR EXISTS (SELECT * FROM Tags t WHERE t.doc_id = d.id AND t.value = 'critical-priority')   
    )

How do I rewrite this query to use more efficient joins?

I could add the first two Tag rules as INNER joins, but how do I process the later part of the rule set? What if there are further rules that require a tag to be present for the document to appear?

Keep in mind that a rule set can be set to match ALL or ANY of the rules in it, and that it could theoretically nest many times over.

Any ideas on a general direction to take to tackle this problem?

Update:

I've optimized my tables, and found a method of querying the tables that seems very quick (apart from COUNTing the number of matching records, which is another problem). I won't ever be selecting more than 100 documents at a time, and with a document set of ~600k and ~2 million tags, this solution returns the results in ~0.02s, which is much better than before.

The tables in question...

CREATE TABLE `app_documents` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `account_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `status_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `subject` varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
  `created` datetime NOT NULL,
  `updated` datetime NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `IDX_B91B1DB99B6B5FBA` (`account_id`),
  KEY `IDX_B91B1DB96BF700BD` (`status_id`),
  KEY `created_idx` (`created`),
  KEY `updated_idx` (`updated`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_B91B1DB96BF700BD` FOREIGN KEY (`status_id`) REFERENCES `app_statuses` (`id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_B91B1DB99B6B5FBA` FOREIGN KEY (`account_id`) REFERENCES `app_accounts` (`id`),
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=500001 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

CREATE TABLE `app_tags` (
  `id` int(11) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `value` varchar(50) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `value_idx` (`value`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=8 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci


CREATE TABLE `app_documents_tags` (
  `document_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  `tag_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`document_id`,`tag_id`),
  KEY `IDX_A849587A700047D2` (`document_id`),
  KEY `IDX_A849587ABAD26311` (`tag_id`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK_A849587ABAD26311` FOREIGN KEY (`tag_id`) REFERENCES `app_tags` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `FK_A849587A700047D2` FOREIGN KEY (`document_id`) REFERENCES `app_documents` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci

And the query I was testing against...

This query finds all documents and their tags that have both tags "blue" and "green" but not "red".

SELECT
    d.*
FROM 
    app_documents d
LEFT JOIN
    app_documents_tags dtg ON ttg.document_id = d.id
LEFT JOIN
    app_tags tg ON tg.id = dtg.tag_id
WHERE
    d.account_id = 1
    AND EXISTS (
        SELECT
            *
        FROM 
            app_tags t1 
        CROSS JOIN 
            app_tags t2
        CROSS JOIN
            app_tags t3
        INNER JOIN
            app_documents_tags dtg1 ON t1.id = ttg1.tag_id
        INNER JOIN
            app_documents_tags dtg2 ON dtg1.ticket_id = dtg2.ticket_id AND dtg2.tag_id = t2.id
        LEFT JOIN
            app_documents_tags dtg3 ON dtg2.ticket_id = dtg3.ticket_id AND dtg3.tag_id = t3.id
        WHERE
            t1.value = 'blue' AND t2.value = 'green' AND t3.value = 'red' AND dtg3.ticket_id IS NULL AND dtg2.document_id = t.id
    )
ORDER BY
    d.created
LIMIT 45

I'm sure this can be improved using better indexes though.

share|improve this question
    
What is the schema of the db or the structure of tables involved? – james_bond Jun 3 '12 at 21:46
    
I listed it in the original question. It's very simplified compared to what I'm working with but its enough to show what I mean. – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 3 '12 at 21:50
    
@BartW if you want to improve the performance we'll need more info about your tables, can you make a show create table and 'EXPLAIN QUERY'? – jcho360 Jun 8 '12 at 12:33
    
I've changed the structure of the tables slightly now to include a 3rd Documents<->Tags joining table which improves performance a bit. I'll post the samples of this and an explain query shortly. – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 8 '12 at 18:36
up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

Forumlate the query from the Question as follows:

  • Collect document IDs having both sales and question tags (subquery AA)
  • Collect document IDs having one of the tags (important,high-priority',critical-priority) (subquery BB)
  • Merge AA and BB and you get subquery DocsWithValidTagRules
  • Join DocsWithValidTagRules with the Documents table for open status
  • Perform your pagination

Given that description, here is the resulting query:

SELECT Documents.id
FROM
(
    SELECT AA.document_id
    (
        SELECT B.document_id,COUNT(1) tagcount FROM
        (
            SELECT id FROM app_tags
            WHERE `value` IN ('sales','question')
        ) A
        INNER JOIN app_documents_tags B
        ON A.id = B.tag_id
        GROUP BY B.document_id
        HAVING COUNT(1) = 2
    ) AA
    INNER JOIN
    (
        SELECT B.document_id,COUNT(1) tagcount FROM
        (
            SELECT id FROM app_tags
            WHERE `value` IN ('important','high-priority','critical-priority')
        ) A
        INNER JOIN app_documents_tags B
        ON A.id = B.tag_id
        GROUP BY B.document_id
    ) BB
) DocsWithValidTagRules
INNER JOIN Documents
ON DocsWithValidTagRules.document_id = Documents.id
WHERE Documents.status = 'open'
LIMIT page_offset,page_size;

Make sure you have this Index on the Documents

ALTER TABLE Documents ADD INDEX status_id_index (status,id);

Give it a Try !!!

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't quite what I went with (I had the subqueries in my main WHERE), but it is very similar and the closest answer so far. I'll have to try your method and see which one is fastest. Thanks! – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 15 '12 at 1:14

Does it have to be a purely sql solution?

You could narrow the data set down with something like this, which has a single join then use whatever language you are retrieving the data with to filter the smaller dataset and with the appropriate logic.

SELECT 
    d.id,
    t.value
FROM
    Documents d 
    JOIN Tags t_required ON t.doc_id=d.id
WHERE
    d.status = 'open'
    and t.value IN ('sales', 'question', 'important', 'high-priority', 'critical-priority' )
share|improve this answer
    
There are a few problems with this approach. It would make pagination of the results difficult, if not impossible. Secondly, to properly paginate and filter the results I would have to retrieve the entire result set (could be millions of records), hydrate all the objects, and then filter them manually. This would be a very expensive process. I'd much rather have the database only return results that match my query. – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 8 '12 at 1:02
    
I can't see much improvement then, over what you have already done. Perhaps you could you make "SELECT * FROM Tags t WHERE t.doc_id = d.id AND t.value IN ('...', '..')" a temporary in memory table or view, then use that view in the subqueries. Without testing against real data, I couldn't say for sure if that would be faster. Have you also looked at things like percona.com for speeding up the database. – bumperbox Jun 8 '12 at 1:15
    
I'm actually going to be deploying this with Percona XtraDB, so I have looked at their various suggestions. The query I gave as an example with several subqueries is pretty much only for demonstration purposes of what I want to avoid. The subqueries can be optimized a bit to include your suggestion, but I'm wondering if there is a better way to do it. – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 8 '12 at 2:24

Have you considered Lucene/Solr

share|improve this answer
    
I have, and it may be a worth while solution in my case. However, in this question I'm looking for ways to build a query based on a "nested rule builder". – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 14 '12 at 16:59

Here is what I do for this problem. In addition to the above relational model, I will create another table that will have just two columns "DocumentID"|"MetadataXML". When I create/update any document, I will create an XML document (preferably Schema validated) that accurately contains all metadata of each document. Then I will use XPATH expressions to search the documents.

It may not be blazing fast, or even fast. But the biggest advantage of this idea is, your data model and the indexes and work flow are stable. All complexity that comes down the road will be abstracted by the XML schema.

In addition, I will implement Lucene/Solr on top of this to provide a fast basic search.

Fast basic full text search -> Lucene/Solr
Advanced Search -> XML/XPATH expression search
Federated Searches, Rest APIs etc -> SQL 
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, the performance is one of the criteria I'm looking for. Anything over 100ms to search a million+ documents is unacceptable. Lucene/Solr are great for searching, but I'm more or less attempting to create a custom "view" of documents based on the criteria given by the user. – Bart Wegrzyn Jun 14 '12 at 17:02

It may not be blazing fast, or even fast. But the biggest advantage of this idea is, your data model and the indexes and work flow are stable. All complexity that comes down the road will be abstracted by the XML schema.

In addition, I will implement Lucene/Solr on top of this to provide a fast basic search.

share|improve this answer

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