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What's the runtime for this nested for loop in big O notation?

for(i = 1 to k)
{
    for(j = i+1 to k)
    {}
}

It's smaller than O(k^2) but I can't figure it out.

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your question is closely related to the series sum S(k) = 0 + 1 + 2 + ... + (k-2) + (k-1). It can be shown that S(k) = (k*(k-1))/2 = (k*k)/2 - k/2. [How? Reorder the sum as S(k) = {0+(k-1)} + {1+(k-2)} + {2+(k-3)} + .... This shows how.]

Therefore, is the algorithmic order smaller than O(k*k)? Remember that constant coefficients like 1/2 do not influence the big O notation.

Question: So it's equivalent to replacing j = i+1 to k with j = 1 to k?

Answer: Right. This is tricky, so let's think it through. For i == 1, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: it runs k-1 times. Again, for i == 2, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: it runs k-2 times. Ultimately, for i == k, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: it runs zero times. Therefore, over all values of i, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: (k-1) + (k-2) + ... + 0, which is just the aforementioned sum S(k).

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So it's equivalent to replacing j = i+1 with j = 1? –  CyberShot Jun 3 '12 at 22:11
    
No. This is tricky, but let's think it through. For i == 1, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: it runs k-1 times. Again, for i == 2, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: it runs k-2 times. Ultimately, for i == k, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: it runs zero times. Therefore, over all values of i, how many times does the inner loop's action run? Answer: (k-1) + (k-2) + ... + 0, which is just the aforementioned sum S(k). –  thb Jun 3 '12 at 22:17
    
I meant it's equivalent in terms of time complexity. Since both give O(k^2) bounds. where j = i+1 gives O(k*(k-1)/2 = O(k^2) and j = 1 is O(k*(k+1)/2) = O(k^2) –  CyberShot Jun 3 '12 at 22:23
    
I see. That's right. You wouldn't think it, but using j = i+1 instead of j = 1 eliminates about half of the invocations of the inner loop's action, but it doesn't eliminate much more than that; so you are correct. –  thb Jun 3 '12 at 22:25
    
Yeah, it's kinda non-intuitive. Thanks! –  CyberShot Jun 3 '12 at 22:27
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