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I tried several ways to change the function name in the definition, but they failed.

>>> def f():
        pass
>>> f.__name__
'f'
>>> def f():
        f.__name__ = 'new name'
>>> f.__name__
'f'
>>> def f():
        self.__name__ = 'new name'
>>> f.__name__
'f'

But I can change the name attribute after defining it.

>>> def f():
        pass
>>> f.__name__ = 'new name'
>>> f.__name__
'new name'

Any way to change/set it in the definition (other than using a decorator)?

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1  
The reason self.__method__() won't work is because self is an argument passed to the argument from the interpreter. There is no mechanism passing an instance to your function. (Incidentally, the variable name doesn't have to be self, it can be foo, or bar or whatever) –  Joel Cornett Jun 3 '12 at 22:33
2  
Are you writing this code for job security? :) –  gnibbler Jun 3 '12 at 22:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The function body is not executed until you execute the function. You could use a decorator though:

def rename(newname):
    def decorator(f):
        f.__name__ = newname
        return f
    return decorator

And then use it like this:

@rename('new name')
def f():
    pass
print f.__name__

However, the function is still only reachable as f.

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The function body is not executed until you call the function, so there's no way you can use the function body to alter what happens at definition time. Why do you want to do this anyway? If you're writing the function and want it to have a different name, just define it with a different name.

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I originally wanted it because I thought I needed it (making a function that returns a function whose name is based on the outer function's parameters). Then I realized I didn't need to do it within the inner function definition, but was still curious anyways. –  Bird Jaguar IV Jun 3 '12 at 23:05

No. The closest you can come to this is defining a callable class with each instance having its __name__ set in the initializer.

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If you put it in the function body, you're saying that part of the execution of f is setting its name to 'new name'. Obviously that's not going to do anything before the function has been called.

Using a decorator is the canonical way to declare that a function is a bit different than its def block alone would indicate, and you're not going to find anything better.

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This is probably stupid but kinda works?

>>> f = None
>>> def new_name():
    global f
    f = new_name


>>> new_name()
>>> f
<function new_name at 0x01945108>
>>> f.__name__
'new_name'
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