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so my javascript is a bit rusty.. i am trying to do this:

        var images = document.getElementsByTagName("img");
        for (var i = images.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            var image = images[i];
            if (image.className == "photo latest_img") {
                image.onclick = function() {
                    // here i will perform a different action depending on what image was clicked           
                    alert(image.src);
                }
            }
        };

i am just trying to assign a function handler, and that function should be aware of which image was clicked.

if i remember correctly, this was a 2 step process to assign a image handler, and pass a reference of that image.

what's the safest cross browser way to do this?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

inside the function use this:

image.onclick = function() {
    // here i will perform a different action depending on what image was clicked           
    alert(this.src);
}
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heh that was easy! so "this" assumes the identity of the owner of the function? –  Sonic Soul Jun 3 '12 at 22:42
    
@SonicSoul no, this depends on how a function is called, per-call-basis, not who "owns" the function (functions cannot be owned anyway). In this situation it would depend on how a particular browser implements onclick handler calling. –  Esailija Jun 3 '12 at 22:42
    
@Esailija: Not quite true: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  mu is too short Jun 3 '12 at 22:45
    
in onclick function the this points to the DOM element that has the onclick callback –  Gavriel Jun 3 '12 at 22:46
    
@muistooshort I don't see Function#bind used here, or it's relevance to my statement. It's still per-call-basis for bound functions as well, it's just that the created proxy function discards it everytime and uses the one in closure to call the target function. –  Esailija Jun 3 '12 at 22:47

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