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Problem overview:

I have database tables that describe data gathering from multiple devices using web services into centralized database.

The table that stores results is deliberately de-normalized for performance: faster querying and grouping by multiple indexes. I am using Entity Framework and Linq for data access.

I need to properly design Linq queries with hierarchical grouping and projection.


Devices database modeling overview:

Currently I have 2 types of devices

1. Rfid devices

First table is RfidTag that describes tag which gathers data, 1 single RfidTag = 1 single sensor. So for example 1 single tag can get data about temperature.

Second table is RfidReader that describes reading module which gather and send all data from attached tags to it. There is no restriction about quantity of attached RfidTags to single RfidReader. However one single RfidTag can be attached to one single RfidReader during reading period.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RfidTag]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    ModifiedDateTime DATETIME,
    --
    ReaderId INT NULL,                  -- Reference to reader
    SensorTypeId INT NOT NULL,          -- Reference to sensor type
    SensorParameters NVARCHAR(50) NULL, -- Sensor parameters
    Hex  NVARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,         -- Hex tag identifier stored as string
    Name NVARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,         -- Tag name
    [Description] NVARCHAR(200) NULL,   -- Tag description
    --
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RfidReader]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime  DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    ModifiedDateTime DATETIME,
    --
    Name        NVARCHAR(20),        -- Tag name
    [Description]   NVARCHAR(200),   -- Tag description                                             
    SerialNumber    NVARCHAR(12),    -- Unique device serial name               
    --
)

Each RfidReader can be attached to specific measurement zone that is described for specific construction.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RfidReaderPlacement]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    --
    ReaderId INT NOT NULL,              -- Reference to Reader.
    MeasurementZoneId INT NOT NULL,     -- Reference to Measurement Zone.
    StartDate DATETIME NOT NULL,        -- Start date of reading.
    StopDate  DATETIME,                 -- End date of reading.
    --
)

Single data gathered by RfidTag is saved in de-normalized table. This table stores millions of records and is really heavy loaded. From this table we will be gathering data using LINQ queries.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[RfidReading]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    ModifiedDateTime DATETIME,
    --
    ReaderPlacementId INT NOT NULL, -- Reference to Rfid Reader Placement
    ConstructionId  INT NOT NULL,   -- Reference to Construction
    MeasurementZoneId INT NOT NULL, -- Reference to Measurement Zone
    ReaderId INT NOT NULL,          -- Reference to Rfid Reader
    TagId    INT NOT NULL,          -- Reference to Rfid Tag
    SensorTypeId INT NOT NULL,      -- Reference to Sensor Type
    ReadingDate DATETIME NOT NULL,  -- Reading date
    Value FLOAT NOT NULL            -- Measured value
    --
)

2. ZigBee devices

First table is ZigBeeNodeProbe that describes single probe that gathers data, 1 single ZigBeeNodeProbe = 1 single sensor. So for example 1 single probe can get data about temperature.

Second table is ZigBeeNode that describes single device that contains attached probes, 1 single ZigBeeNode = 3 ZigBeeNodeProbes.

Third table is ZigBeeReader that describes reading module that gather and send all data from attached nodes to it. There is no restriction about quantity of attached ZigBeeNodes (that has attached ZigBeeNodeProbes) to single ZigBeeReader. However one single ZigBeeNode can be attached to one single ZigBeeReader during reading period.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ZigBeeNodeProbe]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    --
    NodeId INT NULL,                    -- Reference to node
    SensorTypeId INT NOT NULL,          -- Reference to sensor type
    SensorParameters NVARCHAR(50) NULL, -- Sensor parameters
    SocketNumber  INT NOT NULL,         -- Socket number used in parent ZigBeeNode
    Name NVARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,         -- Node name
    [Description] NVARCHAR(200) NULL,   -- Node description
    --
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ZigBeeNode]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    ModifiedDateTime DATETIME,
    --
    ReaderId INT NULL,                    -- Reference to reader
    NetworkAddress  NVARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,-- Node address in ZigBee network
    Name NVARCHAR(50) NOT NULL,           -- Given name
    [Description] NVARCHAR(200) NULL,     -- Tag description
    SocketCount INT NOT NULL DEFAULT 0,   -- Count of available sockets to plug in probe
    NodeFrequency INT NULL,               -- Node frequency
)

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ZigBeeReader]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime  DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    ModifiedDateTime DATETIME,
    --
    Name        NVARCHAR(20),        -- Tag name
    [Description]   NVARCHAR(200),   -- Tag description                                             
    SerialNumber    NVARCHAR(12),    -- Unique device serial name               
    --
)

Each ZigBeeReader can be attached to specific measurement zone that is described for specific construction.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ZigBeeReaderPlacement]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    --
    ReaderId INT NOT NULL,              -- Reference to Reader.
    MeasurementZoneId INT NOT NULL,     -- Reference to Measurement Zone.
    StartDate DATETIME NOT NULL,        -- Start date of reading.
    StopDate  DATETIME,                 -- End date of reading.
    --
)

Single data gathered by ZigBeeNodeProbe is saved in de-normalized table. This table stores millions of records and is really heavy loaded. From this table we will be gathering data using LINQ queries.

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[ZigBeeReading]
(
    Id INT IDENTITY(1,1),
    CreatedDateTime DATETIME NOT NULL DEFAULT GETDATE(),
    ModifiedDateTime DATETIME,
    --
    ReaderPlacementId INT NOT NULL, -- Reference to ZigBee Reader Placement
    ConstructionId    INT NOT NULL, -- Reference to Construction
    MeasurementZoneId INT NOT NULL, -- Reference to Measurement Zone
    ReaderId      INT NOT NULL,     -- Reference to ZigBee Reader
    NodeId        INT NOT NULL,     -- Reference to ZigBee Node
    ProbeId       INT NOT NULL,     -- Reference to ZigBee Node Probe
    SensorTypeId      INT NOT NULL, -- Reference to Sensor Type
    ReadingDate   DATETIME NOT NULL,-- Reading date
    Value         FLOAT NOT NULL    -- Measured value
    --
)

Quering, grouping and projection issues:

As you may see above, we have 2 de-centralized tables that contains data gathered by 2 mentioned types of devices. And yes we may assume that RfidTag is in business modeling almost the same as ZigBeeNodeProbe.

RfidReader
-- RFidTag
-- RFidTag
...

ZigBeeReader
-- ZigBeeNode
---- ZigBeeNodeProbe
---- ZigBeeNodeProbe
---- ZigBeeNodeProbe
-- ZigBeeNode
---- ZigBeeNodeProbe
---- ZigBeeNodeProbe
---- ZigBeeNodeProbe
...

And now we have to query both of these tables, project values from different tables into the same view models, and add specific grouping for filtering data.

Common scenario:

We want to create chart that will present average temperature in specific measurement zone, remember that specific measurement zone may contain multiple attached readers (both Rfid and ZigBee) sow we have to provide series of data.

I am using HightStock http://www.highcharts.com/products/highstock chart that must have enabled:

  • Zoom for 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, etc.
  • From, To date period
  • Export features
  • Legend with enabling and disabling series

Example of chart:

http://jsfiddle.net/hNHUY/1/

Issue:

How to create LINQ Grouping and Projection Query for Hierarchical Data? We need to provide common view model for both RfidReading and ZigBeeReading tables.

My first attempt was with something like:

public class ReadingReaderDataModel
{
    public string SeriesName { get; set; }
    public ReadingPeriod ReadingPeriod { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<ReadingNodeDataModel> ReadingNodeDataModels { get; set; }
    public ReadingReaderDataModel()
    {
        ReadingNodeDataModels = new List<ReadingNodeDataModel>();
    }
}

public class ReadingNodeDataModel
{
    public string NodeName { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<double> DataValues { get; set; }
    public ReadingNodeDataModel()
    {
        DataValues = new LinkedList<double>();
    }
}

public enum ReadingPeriod
{
    OneMonth, ThreeMonths, SixMonths, YearToDay, OneYear, All
}

public enum ReaderType
{
    Rfid, ZigBee
}

Later on I have to design LINQ projection for ASP.NET MVC controller, and here I have no idea how to create proper query that must contain average value from time period grouped by OneMonth, ThreeMonths, SixMonths, YearToDay, OneYear, All.

Can anyone help me design this advanced LINQ query ?

EDIT

Please do not point me any "recommendations" for large datasets...

This is not question about performance.

This question is about complex LINQ query. I am seeking proper LINQ code and NOT answers like "that car is faster and you should try to use that car"... Code answers please... If you do not even try to understand scenario, and provide any code, do not participate...

I specifically added a bounty to find a solution for LINQ, since it is advanced LINQ question as in the subject of this question.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

As I understand, you have millions of records in a database, and you need very good performance from your application, and you have very complex structure.

Stay away from EF and I mean it. You can use it for smaller datasets, but for anything that requires superb performance from a huge query, don't even go there.

My suggestion is to write the queries manually, because if you wanted to optimize as much as you could with EF, you would practically not be able to skip much code anyway and would basically be writing SQL in LINQ way (ie specifying all SELECT statements).

If you want a little bit more specific, use Dapper. It's the "ORM" that runs StackOverflow. There's comparisons on speed here: http://code.google.com/p/dapper-dot-net/

However, if you're dead set on using EF...

Don't try to write one query. It won't happen. Instead, split them. Take a different one for each group that you need to make. It's by far the easiest way out. I believe you should already have a LINQ query for getting just one group out. Now repeat that with every other group you need, especially if you have a ton of Wheres and OrderBy's in it.

Source: a guy that works with large dataset queries daily.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. I had a similar experience when writing some complex queries against a large database and ended up ditching EF too (at least as far as the complex stuff was concerned, I was still able to use it for some of the simple stuff, e.g. Administration, etc). –  Tom Chantler Jun 10 '12 at 17:55
    
@NeroS thanks for "advice" however I have my design principles that I can't change and this question was not about any advice. Your "suggestions" for EF don't add any expertise more that I already know. Finally I am using IQuerable<T> and it will be one big query after C# code will be compiled with the use of LINQ to single complex SQL statement. I am not seeking right now performance optimization, I am seeking appropriate (advanced) LINQ query for mentioned scenario. And I must grant only proper "code answers". And NeroS no offence, yet I can't accept this as solution. –  Daniel Skowroński Jun 10 '12 at 18:01
    
@Dommer I am not seeking right now performance optimization, I am seeking appropriate (advanced) LINQ query for mentioned scenario. –  Daniel Skowroński Jun 10 '12 at 18:03
    
It's not so much about performance but how do you plan on loading all that data in C#, i.e: in memory? millions of row? there's only so much RAM you can put in a computer. –  Baboon Jun 12 '12 at 11:53
3  
What Baboon said. It's not difficult to do what you want (THAT difficult, anyway), but the fact of the matter is that you just don't want to do that. You think you do, but you don't. Things that go this deep and massive were never intended to be used with a full-blown ORM piece. Sure, there's nothing wrong with using a micro-ORM which simply translates fetched results into POCOs, but ultimately you want to handcode it. Trust me (and others in these comments) who tell you so. –  NeroS Jun 12 '12 at 14:45

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