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I wish HTML could do something semantically equivalent to this;

<dl class="main-list">
    <definitionitem>
        <dt>Some Thing</dt>
            <dd>You know it!</dd>
        <dt>Another Thing</dt>
            <dd>Word.</dd>
    </definitionitem>
    <definitionitem>
        <dt>Stuff</dt>
            <dd>Alright!</dd>
    </definitionitem>
</dl>

However, since the closest I've come is something I'm not 100% satisfied with the semantics of;

<div class="redundant-wrapper">
    <dl class="main-list">
        <dt>Some Thing</dt>
            <dd>You know it!</dd>
        <dt>Another Thing</dt>
            <dd>Word.</dd>
    </dl>
    <dl class="another-main-list">
        <dt>Stuff!</dt>
            <dd>Alright!</dd>
    </dl>
</div>

I was wondering if anyone has any other ideas of how you might do this?

Also, the reason the items would be grouped is because they are visually grouped in the content that is being marked up. Imagine a dictionary page, with a single definition list, where each definition is in an inset box that is floated left. I run into this situation all the time.

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5  
There's no 'syntactically valid,' or even 'valid at all' way to wrap a dt and dd together; the only valid children of a dl are dt and dd. –  David Thomas Jun 4 '12 at 0:40
    
I understand that it's not valid. What I'm wondering is, how would people semantically group together a single dt/dd pair as one "definition item", since, semantically, you could make an argument that a definition is a semantic child of a "definition list", itself having children of dt/dd. –  Josiah Sprague Jun 4 '12 at 16:23
2  
@JosiahSprague — You'd put the <dd> element after the <dt> element and before any other <dt> elements. –  Quentin Jun 4 '12 at 16:33
2  
Quentin, that doesn't wrap them in a definition element that can be easily manipulated as one in the DOM. –  Josiah Sprague Jun 4 '12 at 16:35
3  
There was a proposal to do exactly that in XHTML 2.0. The <di> element. But XHTML 2.0 never made it, so your request is off. Edit: Ha, I see you're quoting from that page already. Oh well. –  Mr Lister Jun 4 '12 at 16:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 29 down vote accepted

No, Ian Hickson (HTML spec editor) is convinced that this is a CSS problem, not an HTML one:

This shouldn't be necessary. It's a limitation of CSS.

The right solution is for CSS to provide some pseudo-element or other mechanism that introduces an anonymous container into the rendering tree that wraps the elements you want to wrap.

At the same time, fantasai (CSS spec editor) is convinced in contrary:

I don't think this is a CSS problem. I think it's an HTML problem. Pseudo-elements are a non-trivial thing to spec, and a non-trivial thing to implement, and a comparatively confusing thing to use.

Nevertheless, Ian apparently ignores that and continues to be detached from reality.

There are same problems with LEGEND (that must be first direct child of FIELDSET according to HTML spec), FIGCAPTION (that must be first/last direct child of FIGURE), and LI (direct child of UL/OL).

As for DT/DD in particular, I personally use UL list with DL inside each of LI:

<ul>
    <li><dl>
        <dt>Lorem</dt>
        <dd>Lorem definition</dd>
    </dl></li>

    <li><dl>
        <dt>Ipsum</dt>
        <dd>Ipsum definition</dd>
    </dl></li>
</ul>

So we have DL to make relation between DT and DD, and UL list to make them all belong to one list.

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2  
I love this idea. It's not semantically perfect, but as you stated, the spec doesn't really allow for that. This is the most semantic idea I've heard so far. Thanks for your thoughts! –  Josiah Sprague Jun 13 '12 at 23:47

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