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I've run into a strange issue in Firefox 12. setTimeout() doesn't seem to always wait the appropriate length. Or perhaps it's the date's milliseconds that don't jive?

Check out this fiddle. Essentially, a setTimeout of 100ms seems to run anywhere between 80ms and 110ms. More I can understand, based on John Resig's explanation of timers. But less?

You may have to refresh it once or twice to see the issue, as it sometimes works correctly on the first run. It seems to work spifftacular in IE and Chrome.

Here's the code I'm using in my fiddle:

var txt = '',
    TIMEOUT_LENGTH = 100,
    _now;

now = Date.now || function() { return new Date().getTime() };

function log(time) {
    c = time < 100? 'class="error"' : '';
    $('#log').append('<p '+c+'>waited ' + time + '</p>');
}

function defer() {
    var d = $.Deferred(),
        start = now();
    setTimeout(function() {
        d.resolve(now() - start);
    }, TIMEOUT_LENGTH);
    return d.promise();
}

for (var i = 0; i < 20; i++) {
    defer().then(log);
}

Here's a sample of the quirky output:

enter image description here

Here's my browser info:

enter image description here

And thanks so much for reading my question! I hope someone can shed some light into this.

MORE INFO

I worked around the problem by using setInterval() and checking each increment to see if the required time has passed. See this fiddle.

However, I'm still very interested to hear if anyone can shed some light into the source of the issue

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1  
I can confirm this behavior in Firefox 12 on OS X 10.7. Safari provides anywhere between 100 and 105 for me, Firefox 12 80s-110s for the first run, subsequent runs were... 95-105. –  Tegeril Jun 4 '12 at 2:41
    
Glad to hear it's not just me :) –  Kato Jun 4 '12 at 3:21
    
So that's all we get then. Maybe I'll open up a bug over at mozilla just to see what they say :) –  Kato Jun 5 '12 at 22:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes. setTimeout's accuracy is based off many factors, and isn't guaranteed to always execute at the exact time you specify.

I cannot say this with any authority, but I'll hazard a guess that Firefox, in an attempt to seem faster, will speed up the JS engine temporarily to get everything in motion (which is interesting, because in my experience, timer-based functions actually run slower at first initially in my version of firefox).

Neither setTimeout nor setInterval promise that they will execute at the exact right time, as the link you posted stated. However, with setInterval, you get the benefit of the timer loop doing what it can to "correct itself" by catching up if it lags too far behind, so for whatever you're trying to do, it may be more appropriate.

Anyway, here's my results on my Macbook 10.6.8:

Firefox 5.0.1:

waited 92
waited 92
waited 93
waited 93
waited 93
waited 93
waited 93
waited 94
waited 93
waited 93
waited 93
waited 93
waited 94
waited 94
waited 94
waited 94
waited 94
waited 95
waited 96
waited 96

Safari 5.1.5:

waited 100
waited 104
waited 104
waited 103
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104

Chrome 19.0.1084.52:

waited 101
waited 103
waited 103
waited 104
waited 104
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 103
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
waited 104
share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, setInterval is how I've solved the issue. I just check the timespan on each tick and close out once 100ms has been reached, to make sure it doesn't fall below the minimum. However, this is still a very intriguing problem that I'd like to hear an explanation for (as it seems like it should never run before the set length). –  Kato Jun 4 '12 at 1:48
    
Also, the lack of people complaining about this issue was a bit surprising, so I'm still curious if I'm missing something obvious :) –  Kato Jun 4 '12 at 1:50
    
Just an aside, Firefox 5 is pretty 'old' at this point considering you have Safari and Chrome up to date. –  Tegeril Jun 5 '12 at 4:13

JavaScript is synchronous. The browser will add your setTimeouts to the queue and execute them after

  1. The countdown is over
  2. It has finished any other tasks that are in the queue at the moment the countdown is over.
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1  
Hey thanks! Unfortunately, that doesn't really explain why it would invoke the function before the time specified in setTimeout or why Firefox behaves differently than other browsers. –  Kato Jun 4 '12 at 17:56

I wrote the following function to make sure my code is executed after at least the given amount of milliseconds. I use it instead of setTimeout

mySetTimeout=function(f,t){
    var endTime=new Date().valueOf()+t;
    setTimeout(function(){
        var now=new Date().valueOf();
        if(now<endTime){
            mySetTimeout(f,endTime-now);
        }else{
            f();
        }
    },t);
};
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