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I am attempting to take a list of numbers 0-9 inclusive and return all the permutations of the list. I have come up with two different functions that return the expected result to a certain extent but, neither is exactly what I am aiming for. Here is one that returns the correct results for one cycle:

x = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

def test(x):
  place_holder = 9
  count = 9
  print x
  while count > 1:
    old_x = x[count]
    x[count] = x[count-1]
    x[count-1] = old_x
    count -= 1
    print x
    if count == 1:
      x.sort()
      place_holder -= 1
      count = place_holder

Returns:

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 9, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 9, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 9, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 9, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 9, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 8, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 8, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 8, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 8, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 7, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 7, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 7, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 6, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 6, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 5, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 4, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 4, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 4, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 3, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 3, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 2, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Though when I use another list in the permutation, it gives unexpected results:

x = [1,0,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]

[1, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[1, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 8]
[1, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 7, 8]
[1, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 0, 2, 3, 4, 9, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 0, 2, 3, 9, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 0, 2, 9, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 0, 9, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[1, 9, 0, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 8, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 8, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 8, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 8, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 7, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 7, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 7, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 6, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 6, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 6, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 5, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 5, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 4, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 4, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 4, 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 3, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 3, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 2, 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]

Where it goes through the nine cycle properly then goes back to 0-9. So I could see this is because of the x.sort() call. So I changed this function to this:

def exp_test(x):
  static = []
  for i in x:
    static.append(i)
  place_holder = 9
  count = 9
  print x
  while count > 1:
    old_x = x[count]
    x[count] = x[count-1]
    x[count-1] = old_x
    count -= 1
    print x
    if count == 1:
      x = static
      place_holder -= 1
      count = place_holder

Now this works fine until the shift of the seven and it goes to every second number. I figure the count got mixed up but, I go through and don't see it?

share|improve this question
    
Why not just use itertools.permutations()? docs.python.org/library/itertools.html#itertools.permutations –  mVChr Jun 4 '12 at 2:21
    
I'll give it a look, I put this together not knowing or having any experience of permutations. The question was slightly ambiguous to boot. –  tijko Jun 4 '12 at 2:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try modifying x = static in the last if statement to x = static[:]. The problem is that you are simply rebinding the name x to the same list that static is bound to. You really want to make a copy of what static is bound to instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey thanks for the help! Now I know if I were to assign static = x, then if I change x, static changes too. I didn't realize that this works in reverse as well. If I'm not saying that right could you let me know :D –  tijko Jun 4 '12 at 2:47
    
I put in the lines for appending the items in x to a new list static specifically for that reason not knowing it works the other way around too. Now I could take that out and just put static = x[:] and in the if x = static[:], correct? –  tijko Jun 4 '12 at 3:15

The best solution would be

from itertools import permutations

but if you must write it yourself, the usual solution is recursive:

def permutations(seq):
    _len = len(seq)
    if _len:
        if _len==1:
            yield seq
        else:
            for p in permutations(seq[1:]):
                for i in range(_len):
                    yield p[:i] + seq[0:1] + p[i:]

Edit: well, the Euler problem requires a different approach altogether... the trick is not to generate all permutations up to 1,000,000 (which would be far too slow), but to calculate what the millionth permutation must be. There are n! ways to arrange n items - you can recursively use this on the tail of the sequence to figure out how many subsequences have to be rearranged to get to the millionth arrangement, and from that work out what the arrangement must be.

You need to write something more like

def nth_arrangement(seq, n):
    # you have to figure this bit out!
share|improve this answer
    
Hey Bothwell, I appreciate the response. Like I said in the comment above, I tried to does this with barely any background knowledge of permutations and a question that could have been more explicit on how the ordering should go. I've come up with several different sequencing functions that I believed was what they wanted :| . –  tijko Jun 4 '12 at 2:28
    
@tijko: ok... so what was the original question, exactly? –  Hugh Bothwell Jun 4 '12 at 2:29
    
@Bothwell: well it is a project euler question, so I was really hesitant to ask for help that would solve it for me. It was to give the one millionth permutation of 0-9(inclusive). With the example being [0,1,2], [0,2,1], [1,0,2], [1,2,0], [2,0,1], [2,1,0]. So I first started cycle the second to first number out instead of outside in. –  tijko Jun 4 '12 at 2:36

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