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Consider a simple example like this which links two sliders using signals and slots:

from PySide.QtCore import *
from PySide.QtGui import *
import sys

class MyMainWindow(QWidget):
 def __init__(self):
  QWidget.__init__(self, None)

  vbox = QVBoxLayout()

  sone = QSlider(Qt.Horizontal)
  vbox.addWidget(sone)

  stwo = QSlider(Qt.Horizontal)
  vbox.addWidget(stwo)

  sone.valueChanged.connect(stwo.setValue)

if __name__ == '__main__':
 app = QApplication(sys.argv)
 w = MyMainWindow()
 w.show()
 sys.exit(app.exec_())

How would you change this so that the second slider moves in the opposite direction as the first? Slider one would be initialized with these values:

  sone.setRange(0,99)
  sone.setValue(0)

And slider two would be initialized with these values:

  stwo.setRange(0,99)
  stwo.setValue(99)

And then the value of stwo would be 99 - sone.sliderPosition.

How would you implement the signal and slot to make this work? I would appreciate a working example that builds on the simple example above.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your example is a bit broken, because you forgot to set the parent of the layout, and also to save the slider widgets as member attributes to be accessed later... But to answer your question, its really as simple as just pointing your connection to your own function:

class MyMainWindow(QWidget):
    def __init__(self):
        QWidget.__init__(self, None)

        vbox = QVBoxLayout(self)

        self.sone = QSlider(Qt.Horizontal)
        self.sone.setRange(0,99)
        self.sone.setValue(0)
        vbox.addWidget(self.sone)

        self.stwo = QSlider(Qt.Horizontal)
        self.stwo.setRange(0,99)
        self.stwo.setValue(99)
        vbox.addWidget(self.stwo)

        self.sone.valueChanged.connect(self.sliderChanged)

    def sliderChanged(self, val):
        self.stwo.setValue(self.stwo.maximum() - val)

Note how sliderChanged() has the same signature as the original setValue() slot. Instead of connecting one widget directly to the other, you connect it to a custom method and then transform the value to what you want, and act how you want (setting a custom value on stwo)

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for the bad example. I'm just learning. I tried running your example and I got an empty window with no sliders (and no errors). Then I noticed you edited your answer. Now I get an error "NameError: name 'QWidget' is not defined" when I try to run your code. I'll see if I can figure it out. BTW, thanks for the suggestions on how to approach this the right way. –  MountainX Jun 4 '12 at 5:46
    
Got it working. Thanks. –  MountainX Jun 4 '12 at 5:50
    
@MountainX: no need to apologize for your examples. You had a well organized question. Glad you got it working! –  jdi Jun 4 '12 at 15:18

You can connect signals to functions that do things. Your code isn't structured to do that easily and required refactoring, so you can do it the easy way:

stwo.setInvertedAppearance(True)
sone.valueChanged.connect(stwo.setValue)
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Here's the way I did it. I added this class which reimplements setValue. (I got the idea from http://zetcode.com/tutorials/pyqt4/eventsandsignals/)

class MySlider(QSlider):
    def __init__(self):
        QSlider.__init__(self, Qt.Horizontal)

    def setValue(self, int):
        QSlider.setValue(self, 99-int)

Here's the complete code. Is this a good approach?

from PySide.QtCore import *
from PySide.QtGui import *
import sys

class MySlider(QSlider):
    def __init__(self):
        QSlider.__init__(self, Qt.Horizontal)

    def setValue(self, int):
        QSlider.setValue(self, 99-int)

class MyMainWindow(QWidget):
 def __init__(self):
  QWidget.__init__(self, None)

  vbox = QVBoxLayout()

  sone = QSlider(Qt.Horizontal)
  sone.setRange(0,99)
  sone.setValue(0)
  vbox.addWidget(sone)

  stwo = MySlider()
  stwo.setRange(0,99)
  stwo.setValue(0)
  vbox.addWidget(stwo)

  sone.valueChanged.connect(stwo.setValue)

  self.setLayout(vbox)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app = QApplication(sys.argv)
    w = MyMainWindow()
    w.show()
    sys.exit(app.exec_())
share|improve this answer
    
You didnt need to subclass. Just connect to another slot. Make use of the fact that you can connect a signal to any method. The problem I think with this approach is that you are avoiding the easier route of using the functionality that is already available on the Qt class, and subclassing when its not needed. Save your widgets as instance attributes and use them. –  jdi Jun 4 '12 at 5:39
    
Also, now you have a MySlider class that is simply hard coded to setting its value as 99-int (int btw shadows the built-in int) –  jdi Jun 4 '12 at 5:47
    
@jdi: OK, thanks for your answer. –  MountainX Jun 4 '12 at 5:47
    
@jdi: I appreciate the feedback about int shadowing the built-in int. The code should be `def setValue(self, val): QSlider.setValue(self, 99-val)'. But your approach is better anyway. This was a learning exercise for me, so now I know a couple ways to do it. –  MountainX Jun 4 '12 at 5:58

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