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Can setting the cpu affinity in linux for a multithreaded program where each thread runs on each core effectively block any other process from being scheduled by the os on that core. Effectively I want to guarantee the use of a core to my process and have all other non critical programs bound to a minimal number of cores.

Or am I missing something with the linux scheduler, or maybe I need my own.

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What characteristics of your Linux kernel's thread scheduler makes the default behaviour unsuitable for your application? – ta.speot.is Jun 4 '12 at 6:41
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Can setting the cpu affinity in linux for a multithreaded program where each thread runs on each core effectively block any other process from being scheduled by the os on that core

No, setting the cpu affinity prevents the scheduler from using some cores for your threads. That is, it will only schedule your threads on certain cores - it doesn't do anything to other threads.

You can probably achieve what you want using setpriority. If your requirements are that stringent, you might look into sched_setscheduler and choose SCHED_RR or SCHED_FIFO.

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Do you mean to say that I can use the linux scheduler to queue my own threads? – BAR Jun 4 '12 at 7:03
    
@user417896 You're already using it. But the scheduler is smart enough to know about multiple classes of processes. SCHED_RR and SCHED_FIFO are always scheduled before other processes. – cnicutar Jun 4 '12 at 7:04
    
@cnicutar, that's cutting corners a little. SCHED_RR and SCHED_FIFO are only scheduled in preference to other processes of the same priority. But even that is not necessarily true if these processes have been starving long enough and need some cpu time now. – Klaas van Gend Jun 5 '12 at 7:59

When the scheduler is actively involved, taskset and nice will only give a hint to the scheduler about your preferences. The scheduler is free to reschedule any of the threads on any of the available cores based on the workload. You can use perf to monitor context switches and cpu migrations.

You have two options:

  1. You can force the scheduler to follow your orders trough sched_setscheduler as user417896 sugggested.
  2. You can use cgroups/cpuset to define two cpusets,say system and isolated, and isolate the target cores by moving all the system threads to system cpuset and run your program using cgexec on the isolated cpuset. You can assign cores and memory to a cpuset and in order to isolate it set cpu_exclusive bit and you are all set. You an also use cset (http://code.google.com/p/cpuset/) if you are using older kernels to automate this process for you.

I hope it helps.

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