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I'm getting trouble with the following code with Visual Studio 2010 C++.

makeA() is just an object generator idiom in C++ (like std::make_pair)

#include <stdio.h>

struct A{ // 7th line
    A() {}
    A(A &&) {printf("move\n");}
    ~A() {printf("~A();\n");}
private:
    A(const A &) {printf("copy\n");} // 12th line
};

A makeA()
{
    return A();
}

int main()
{
    A &&rrefA(makeA()); // 22nd line
    return 0;
}

Error message

2>d:\test.cpp(22): error C2248: 'A::A' : cannot access private member declared in class 'A'
2>          d:\test.cpp(12) : see declaration of 'A::A'
2>          d:\test.cpp(7) : see declaration of 'A'
2>

I expect makeA() to call both A() constructor and A(A &&) constructor, and 22nd line to call makeA() and nothing else. (If without RVO) The compiler should not require A(const A &) constructor to be accessible, am I right?

Can you tell me what's wrong with the code?

With recent version of g++, 'g++ -std=c++0x' and 'g++ -std=c++0x -fno-elide-constructors' compiles the code without any error.

share|improve this question
    
Try changing A() to {} - it might be related to this: stackoverflow.com/questions/7935639/… – Pubby Jun 4 '12 at 8:13
    
@Pubby Good link, but I think that's somehow different issue. Leaving `A makeA();' only in the code and moving the body of makeA() to the other file should make the mentioned change invisible. Without the 22nd line, the code compiles. I think it's not the problem of makeA() function. – kcm1700 Jun 4 '12 at 8:25
1  
99% sure this is a compiler bug. Please post a bug report on MS Connect and post a link to it here. – ildjarn Jun 4 '12 at 20:10
1  
This bug is fixed in VS2012 RC. Time to move onto VS2012. – kcm1700 Jun 5 '12 at 5:02
up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's a bug in the optimizer. The compiler attempts to ellide the move, but is only programmed to ellide a copy constructor- which requires a copy constructor to exist to be ellided in the first place.

I don't recall what (if any) the fix for this error is, but it might have been fixed in SP1.

share|improve this answer
    
Not fixed in VC++ 2010 SP1. Maybe in VC11? – ildjarn Jun 4 '12 at 20:10
1  
I've installed VS 2012 RC and checked the code working. It's fixed in VS2012. Thank you. – kcm1700 Jun 5 '12 at 5:01
    
Oh, it works if the copy constructor is not defined, I think, but still publicly accessible. – Puppy Jun 5 '12 at 5:14
    
Maybe publicly accessible default copy constructor was considered to be calling. – kcm1700 Jun 5 '12 at 5:58

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