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When I try to specialize a public member function template within the class definition/declaration:

#include <iostream>

class surfaceMesh 
{
    public:
        // Uncomment for Version 0 and 1
        class AREA_AVERAGE {};
        class ANGLE_AVERAGE {};  

        template<class Average>
        void vertexNormals() {}

        // Uncomment: Version 0
        //template<>
        //void vertexNormals<AREA_AVERAGE> ()
        //{
            //std::cout << "AREA_AVERAGE" << std::endl;
        //}

        //template<>
        //void vertexNormals<ANGLE_AVERAGE> ()
        //{
            //std::cout << "ANGLE_AVERAGE" << std::endl;
        //}


};

// Uncommend for version 1 
template<>
void surfaceMesh::vertexNormals<surfaceMesh::AREA_AVERAGE> ()
{
    std::cout << "AREA_AVERAGE" << std::endl;
};

template<>
void surfaceMesh::vertexNormals<surfaceMesh::ANGLE_AVERAGE> ()
{
    std::cout << "ANGLE_AVERAGE" << std::endl;
};


int main()
{
    surfaceMesh m;

    m.vertexNormals<surfaceMesh::AREA_AVERAGE>();
    m.vertexNormals<surfaceMesh::ANGLE_AVERAGE>();

    return 0;
}

For Version 0, the error is:

main.cpp:19: error: template-id ‘vertexNormals<mesh::AREA_AVERAGE>’ in declaration of primary template
main.cpp:24: error: explicit specialization in non-namespace scope ‘class mesh’
main.cpp:25: error: template-id ‘vertexNormals<mesh::ANGLE_AVERAGE>’ in declaration of primary template
main.cpp:25: error: ‘void mesh::vertexNormals()’ cannot be overloaded
main.cpp:19: error: with ‘void mesh::vertexNormals()’

Version 1 compiles and runs. Of course, usually I am separating the class declaration and definition, but I would really like to know why this happens.

Also, is this a good way to specialize an interface? The other option would be to overload the function vertexNormals to take an object of AREA_AVERAGE or ANGLE_AVERAGE, but this is just a type telling me which kind of function I will be using, it is not supposed to be instantiated, so using templates 'feels' like a right choice.

share|improve this question
    
You cannot partially specialize any function template at all (what you have outside of the class is a full specialization). –  n.m. Jun 4 '12 at 9:01
    
to my surprise, version 0 compiles in Visual Studio 2010 –  weidi Jun 4 '12 at 9:02
    
@n.m. fixed it in the question, thanks. –  tmaric Jun 4 '12 at 9:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Why is it not allowed to specialize a member function template within a class?

Because that is the rule laid down by the C++ Standard.

As for what you want, a better approach is to use function overload rather than function specialization as:

class surfaceMesh 
{
    public:
        // Uncomment for Version 0 and 1
        class AREA_AVERAGE {};
        class ANGLE_AVERAGE {};  

        template<class Average>
        void vertexNormals() 
        {
           //invoke the function overload
           vertexNormals(static_cast<Average*>(0));
        }
private:
        //make the overloads private, so client will not call them!
        void vertexNormals(AREA_AVERAGE *)
        {
           std::cout << "AREA_AVERAGE" << std::endl;
        }
        void vertexNormals(ANGLE_AVERAGE*)
        {
           std::cout << "ANGLE_AVERAGE " << std::endl;
        }
};

The type of the expression static_cast<Average*>(0) helps the compiler to choose the correct overload.

share|improve this answer
    
O.K., but should I not avoid the use of basic pointers and explicit clean up that they require? Also, does this not mean that the client needs to pass an actual object of an averaging type that is just used to distinct between the different methods? –  tmaric Jun 4 '12 at 9:09
1  
@tomislav-maric: You're not allocating memory when you call the overloads. You just use static_cast<Average*>(0) which is NULL but this expression has type which helps the compiler. –  Nawaz Jun 4 '12 at 9:16
    
@tomislav-maric: Also, the overloads are private. So the client will call only the function template, which in turn calls the private overload. –  Nawaz Jun 4 '12 at 9:19
1  
Of course! :)) Thank you!! –  tmaric Jun 4 '12 at 9:25
1  
As long as your AREA_AVERAGE and ANGLE_AVERAGE classes are empty, you could also pass actual objects instead of a (NULL) pointer; as the objects contain no data, there is no overhead involved. –  wolfgang Jun 4 '12 at 11:08

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