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I'm trying a problem in which I have to partition a no. N into M partitions as many as possible.

Example:

N=1 M=3 , break 1 into 3 parts

0 0 1
0 1 0
1 0 0

N=3 M=2 , break 3 into 2 parts

2 1
1 2
3 0
0 3

N=4 M=4 , break 4 into 4 parts

0 0 0 4
0 0 4 0
0 4 0 0
4 0 0 0
0 0 1 3
0 1 0 3
0 1 3 0
.
.
.

and so on.

I did code a backtrack algo. which produce all the possible compositions step by step, but it chokes for some larger input.Because many compositions are same differing only in ordering of parts.I want to reduce that.Can anybody help in providing a more efficient method.

My method:

void backt(int* part,int pos,int n) //break N into M parts
{
    if(pos==M-1)
    {
        part[pos]=n;
        ppart(part);   //print part array
        return;
    }

    if(n==0)
    {
        part[pos]=0;
        backt(part,pos+1,0);
        return;
    }

    for(int i=0;i<=n;i++)
    {
        part[pos]=i;

        backt(part,pos+1,n-i);
    }
}

In my algo. n is N and it fill the array part[] for every possible partition of N.

What I want to know is once generating a composition I want to calculate how many times that composition will occur with different ordering.For ex: for N=1 ,M=3 ::: composition is only one : <0,0,1> ,but it occurs 3 times. Thats what I want to know for every possible unique composition.

for another example: N=4 M=4

composition <0 0 0 4> is being repeated 4 times. Similarly, for every unique composition I wanna know exactly how many times it will occur .

Looks like I'm also getting it by explaining here.Thinking.

Thanks.

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The number of such partitions grows REALLY fast. Are you sure you need to generate all the partitions or simply computing the number of partitions will be enough for you? –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jun 4 '12 at 11:04
    
Yes,I want that , I mean once generating a composition I want to calculate how many times that composition will occur with different ordering.For ex: for N=1 ,M=3 ::: composition is only one : <0,0,1> ,but it occurs 3 times. Thats what I want to know for every possible unique composition. –  N.K.-731 Jun 4 '12 at 13:42
1  
You do not need the rest of the problem to figure out how many times does a composition appear. It is only a matter of counting the number of different permutations with repetition. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jun 4 '12 at 14:32
    
for <0,0,0,4> the number of unique permutations is 4!/(3! * 1!) for <0,0,0,4, 4> it is 5!/(3! * 2!) and for <0,0,0,4,4, 5> it is 6!/(3! * 2! * 1!) –  goat Jun 4 '12 at 14:52

2 Answers 2

You can convert an int to a partitioning as follows:

vector<int> part(int i, int n, int m)
{
    int r = n; // r is num items remaining to be allocated

    vector<int> result(m, 0); // m entries inited to 0

    for (int j = 0; j < m-1; j++)
    {
        if (r == 0) // if none left stop
            break;

        int k = i % r; // mod out next bucket
        i /= r; // divide out bucket
        result[j] = k; // assign bucket
        r -= k; // remove assigned items from remaining
    }

    result[m-1] = r; // put remainder in last bucket

    return result;
}

So you can use this as follows:

for (int i = 0; true; i++)
{
    vector<int> p = part(i, 3, 4);

    if (i != 0 && p.back() == 3) // last part
       break;

    ... // use p

};

It should be clear from this how to make an incremental version of part too.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried your algo. to run it , but doesn't get how it really is different from my mine one.You also are generating every composition again & again , difference I notice is you're generating incremental version. I think I failed to explain what I want.Apologies for that.Let me edit post. –  N.K.-731 Jun 4 '12 at 13:48
    
Besides condition fails on 1st loop itself::: if (p.back() == 3) –  N.K.-731 Jun 4 '12 at 13:48
    
@N.K.-731: fixed –  Andrew Tomazos Jun 4 '12 at 21:56

A much simpler and mathematical approach:

This problem is equivalent to finding the co-efficient of x^N in the expression f(x) = (1+x+x^2+x^3+....+x^N)^M

f(x) = ((x^(N-1) - 1)/(x-1))^M differentiate it M times(d^Nf(x)/dx^N) and the co-efficient will be (1/n!)*(d^Nf(x)/dx^N) at x = 0;

differentiation can be done using any numerical differentiation technique. So the complexity of the algorithm is O(N*complexity_of_differentiation)..

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