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I want to design a user/role system:

The users have a name and a password and then the user can have several roles like Admin.

For this I created a schema like this:

Users:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Users]
(
    [id] [int] NOT NULL,
    [name] [nvarchar](50) NULL,
    [password] [nvarchar](50) NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK_Users] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([id] ASC)
)

Roles:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Roles]
(
    [id] [int] NOT NULL,
    [name] [nvarchar](50) NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK_Roles] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([id] ASC)
)

user_roles:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[User_Roles]
(
    [id] [int] NOT NULL,
    [User_id] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Role_id] [int] NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK_User_Roles] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([id] ASC)
)

My question is: should I use foreign keys User_Roles.User_id -> User.Id

If yes why?

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1  
YES! Of course you should have foreign keys. Why, you ask?? FK help ensure data consistency - and without FK, you can store any kind of id into your user_roles table - without checking whether those refer to valid users and/or roles - not something you want to do (and not something you want to have to clean up later on!) –  marc_s Jun 4 '12 at 10:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not quite sure what you mean, but...

  • User_Roles should have 2 columns only User_id and Role_id
    Both of these form the Primary Key
  • You do not need an extra id column User_Roles
  • User_id is a foreign key to Users.id
  • Role_id is a foreign key to Roles.id

Edit: Now I understand. Yes, always use foreign keys

Also...

  • if password is nvarchar(50), this implies plain text. This is bad.
  • if you have duplicate name values in Users, how do you know which user is which?
    Especially if they have the same password (which will happen because we meatsacks are stupid)

Edit after comment after primary key creation...

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[User_Roles]
(
    [User_id] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Role_id] [int] NOT NULL,

    CONSTRAINT [PK_User_Roles] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED ([User_id], [Role_id]),
    CONSTRAINT [UQ_ReversePK] UNIQUE ([Role_id], [User_id])
)
share|improve this answer
    
password and username is just for the demo, its not plain text. my focus is on the role system –  gurehbgui Jun 4 '12 at 9:46
    
how to set the primary key in user_roles? –  gurehbgui Jun 4 '12 at 13:29
    
@gurehbgui: added some SQL –  gbn Jun 4 '12 at 13:32

Always use foreign keys when the data models a relation. In your sample, if you don't create the foreign keys, there is nothing preventing you (or someone else with access to the database) from mistakenly (or deliberately) deleting a role which is currently used.

Let's say you have many users and a few roles. One of the roles is called 'Admin' and is required in you application in order to do some tasks. If you don't have the foreign keys setup, there is nothing in the database to prevent someone from deleting the admin role, casuing your application to:

  • Probably crash since it will look for a role which is no longer in the database
  • If not the above, then at least no users will have the 'Admin' role, closing down the parts of the application where it is required

If, on the othe hand you HAVE setup the foreign keys, you will receive an error from the database if you try to delete a role which is currently assigned to some user (through the User_Roles table).

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