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After collecting some experience with smaller and larger JSF implementations i decided for me that this is our way to go for web app - this is not about any "xyz sucks" discussion. Its simply about feasibility and reusing the assets we have so far vs. platform footprint.

The question arises in a current project where the final product will live in hardware box with yet unspecified memory and CPU - for cost reasons it will be comparable to any modern router or access box. Does anybody have experience implementing

  • A (simple) Java based web application
  • Using JSF (vs. some "low profile" framework)
  • Using a persistence framework vs. native H2 vs native SQLite vs File based persistence

on such a device?

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So you want to know if JSF and a persistence framework are a good idea on a box for which no actual capabilities are known? Without any other info, my first reaction is no; resource-constrained devices are not a great place for full-on frameworks that have been designed for use on a real server. –  Dave Newton Jun 4 '12 at 9:47
    
I would strongly suggest doing a prototype of some simple operations on a typical desktop computer, and then measure with JVisualVM (from the jdk) with a semi-realistic load. You might simply have to choose something simpler because of limited resources. Or you may not. Experiment to find out. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 4 '12 at 10:05
    
Thx for your comments. I hoped it has always been done - so maybe i can save my time spent on failing again. I fear that using some special technology may nearly double the cost for my prototype. And again, i have still a framework to find... –  mtraut Jun 4 '12 at 10:25
    
The limit in this case will be put for your Web container + JVM + persistence framework. The overhead imposed by JSF or any other web framework will not be significant compared with the other elements in consideration. Tomcat works well in devices with limited memory ... –  lu4242 Jun 4 '12 at 12:56
    
Hi @lu4242 - do you have some real world data (something like "a web page accessing simple sqlite data works in less then 32 MB within 500ms for 5 concurrent users")? –  mtraut Jun 6 '12 at 10:38

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The limit in this case will be put for your Web container + JVM + persistence framework. The overhead imposed by JSF or any other web framework will not be significant compared with the other elements in consideration. Tomcat works well in devices with limited memory.

QUESTION: Do you have some real world data (something like "a web page accessing simple sqlite data works in less then 32 MB within 500ms for 5 concurrent users")?

The best information available is this article I wrote some weeks ago:

Understanding JSF 2 and Wicket: Performance Comparison . In the detailed document (memory section), there is a test running tomcat with 32 MB and an in-memory hsql database and 40 concurrent threads with server side (in memory) state saving. I think the trick is watch out for what you put in session scope, and that's it.

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