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This is my code.It's very simple.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <pthread.h>

void *func(void *arg)
{
    printf("ID=%d\n", *(int*)arg);
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main()
{
    pthread_t pt[4];
    int i;

    for (i =0 ; i < 4; i++)
    {
        int temp = i;
        pthread_create(&pt[i], NULL, func, (void*)&temp);
    }
    sleep(1);
    return 0;
}

I compiled it:

gcc p_test.c -lpthread

I run it.It print2 2 3 3, I run it again, It print 2 3 3 2.

My problem is:

why 2 or 3 has printed twice

why it didn't print 1 3 2 0 or anthor result that no number had not be printed twice.

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3 Answers 3

The major problem here is that you're taking the address of the local variable temp, and then using that pointer outside the scope of the variable - as soon as you exit one iteration of the loop, your pointer to temp becomes invalid and you must not dereference it.

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You're passing a pointer to a temporary variable into the thread creation function and this temporary goes out of scope at the end of the loop block. It would seem to me that the temporary address is being reused by the compiler and so that when the threads are executing, they see the same address location.

If you do:

int *temp = malloc(sizeof(int));
*temp = i;
pthread_create(&pt[i], NULL, func, (void*)temp);

instead, you should see the results you expect.

In this case, the thread function needs to free the int after it is printed it to avoid a memory leak.

Also, it's better practice to pthread_join() the threads that you're waiting for rather than just sleep()ing.

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Although do make sure you free up your allocated memory somewhere (thread exit would be one good place) to avoid the obvious memory leak. –  Philip Kendall Jun 4 '12 at 12:24
    
@Philip Kendall - yes! I just realised i should point that out as well. –  TheJuice Jun 4 '12 at 12:25
1  
This works, but it would be a whole lot more efficient to just cast the integer argument to void *... –  R.. Jun 4 '12 at 12:26
    
is this 100% safe? you can free the memory before you use it in funk(). –  fhtuft Jun 4 '12 at 12:53
1  
@fhtuft: the idea is to free the memory in the thread function, not in main (although I admit the wording is slightly confusing at the moment). –  Philip Kendall Jun 4 '12 at 12:57

because it prints temp, all threads shares the memory(why temp is "shared" is explained by TheJuice), so all threads "share" temp . Use a mutex or make temp a private variable. Private Variables in Threads

Or you can use phtread_join like this:

int main()
{
    pthread_t pt[4];
    int i;

    for (i =0 ; i < 4; i++)
    {

      pthread_create(&pt[i], NULL, func, (void*)&i);
      pthread_join(pt[i],NULL);

    }

    //sleep(1);
    return 0;
}
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Not quite: this example is significantly different as temp is going out of scope. As such, the attempts to dereference it in the threads will be invoking undefined behaviour. –  Philip Kendall Jun 4 '12 at 12:33

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