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When using Task<T>, an exception during the execution of the task is thrown during Task.Wait(); when using F#'s MailBoxProcessor, the exception gets swallowed and needs to be explicitly dealt with as per this question.

This difference makes it difficult to expose F# agents to C# code via a Task. For example, this agent:

type internal IncrementMessage = 
    Increment of int * AsyncReplyChannel<int>

type IncrementAgent() =
    let counter = Agent.Start(fun agent -> 
        let rec loop() = async { let! Increment(msg, replyChannel) = agent.Receive()
                                match msg with 
                                | int.MaxValue -> return! failwith "Boom!"
                                | _ as i -> replyChannel.Reply (i + 1)
                                            return! loop() }

        loop())

    member x.PostAndAsyncReply i =
        Async.StartAsTask (counter.PostAndAsyncReply (fun channel -> Increment(i, channel)))

can be called from C#, but the exception is not returned to C#:

[Test]
public void ExceptionHandling()
{
    //
    // TPL exception behaviour
    //
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew<int>(() => { throw new Exception("Boom!"); });

    try
    {
        task.Wait();
    }
    catch(AggregateException e)
    {
        // Exception available here
        Console.WriteLine("Task failed with {0}", e.InnerException.Message);
    }

    //
    // F# MailboxProcessor exception behaviour
    //
    var incAgent = new IncrementAgent();
    task = incAgent.PostAndAsyncReply(int.MaxValue);

    try
    {
        task.Wait(); // deadlock here
    }
    catch (AggregateException e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Agent failed with {0}", e.InnerException.Message);
    }
}

Instead of getting the exception, the C# code just hangs at task.Wait(). Is there any way to get the F# agent to behave like a Task? If not, it seems like there is limited use in exposing F# agents to other .NET code.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One way to handle it is have the agent return a DU with an error case. You could then raise the exception from outside the agent.

type internal IncrementResponse =
    | Response of int
    | Error of exn

type internal IncrementMessage = 
    | Increment of int * AsyncReplyChannel<IncrementResponse>

type IncrementAgent() =
    let counter = Agent.Start(fun agent -> 
        let rec loop() = 
          async { 
            let! Increment(msg, replyChannel) = agent.Receive()
            match msg with 
            | int.MaxValue -> replyChannel.Reply (Error (Failure "Boom!"))
            | _ as i -> replyChannel.Reply (Response(i + 1))
            return! loop() 
          }
        loop())

    member x.PostAndAsyncReply i =
        Async.StartAsTask (
          async {
            let! res = counter.PostAndAsyncReply (fun channel -> Increment(i, channel))
            match res with
            | Response i -> return i
            | Error e -> return (raise e)
          }
        )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is exactly what I was looking for! I haven't got my head around return (raise e) being a legal construct, even though my code used a similar return! failwith "Boom!". –  Akash Jun 4 '12 at 18:25
    
raise is defined as returning 'T, but of course it never really returns at all. This allows it to be used anywhere, regardless of the enclosing expression's type. –  Daniel Jun 4 '12 at 18:28
    
@Akash: You could also write: return match res with Response i -> i | Error e -> raise e. –  Daniel Jun 4 '12 at 18:31

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