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I'm trying to learn Haskell but I'm having problem in monad usage.

I imported the module Data.Maybe.

But I don't know how to use the >>= operator.

Given (>>=) :: Monad m => m a -> (a -> m b) -> m b I cannot understand how to define a function (a -> m b).

Can someone provide some pedagogical example?

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The following provides an explanation: en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Haskell/… –  Simeon Visser Jun 4 '12 at 13:06
2  
When you're reasoning about any function where you have Monad m => ... you can substitute m for the specific monad you're reasoning about. Hence, for Maybe, we have (>>=) :: Maybe a -> (a -> Maybe b) -> Maybe b. A function with return type Maybe b must return either Just someB or Nothing. –  Sarah Jun 4 '12 at 13:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For Maybe monad bind function (>>=) looks like that:

(>>=) :: Maybe a -> (a -> Maybe b) -> Maybe b

So, let's define some Maybe a value:

> let a = Just 1
a :: Maybe Integer

And :: a -> Maybe b function:

> let f = \x -> Just (x+1)
f :: Integer -> Maybe Integer

Now we can use bind like infix operator:

> a >>= f
Just 2
it :: Maybe Integer

Another example of really a -> Maybe b function could be:

let h :: Integer -> Maybe String; h = return . show . (+1)
h :: Integer -> Maybe String

So h increment integer number, convert it to string and make a Maybe value with return function.

> a >>= h
Just "2"
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You could possibly demonstrate how "failure" propagates through. That is, the result of Nothing >>= f. –  dbaupp Jun 4 '12 at 13:13
    
@dbaupp you could add your example by editing asnwer. –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Jun 4 '12 at 13:16

A fairly common example with the Maybe monad is division. In some ways, the Maybe monad represents a computation that either gives a result (Just) or fails (Nothing), and division is precisely this: it works unless you are dividing by 0, in which case it is a failure.

Code is always useful:

divide :: (Fractional a) => a -> a -> Maybe a
divide a 0 = Nothing
divide a b = Just $ a / b

Some examples of using this function:

> divide 1 2
Just 0.5
> divide 20 3
Just 6.666666666666667
> divide 1 0 -- Oops
Nothing

Because Maybe is a monad, we can have computations that use this divide function and automatically propagate any errors. E.g. the following computes 1/x + 1 safely

recipPlusOne :: (Fractional a) => a -> Maybe a
recipPlusOne x = divide 1 x >>= return . (+1)

-- equivalently,
recipPlusOne' x = fmap (+1) $ divide 1 x

(Notice how return . (+1) is a function a -> m b, since it takes a number, adds one ((+1)), and then wraps it in the Maybe monad (return).)

And the errors propagate through,

> recipPlusOne 1
Just 2.0
> recipPlusOne 0.1
Just 11.0
> recipPlusOne 0 -- Oops, divide by 0
Nothing
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