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I've got a busybox system which doesn't have uniq and I'd like to generate a unique list of duplicated lines.

A plain uniq emulated in awk would be:

sort <filename> | awk '!($0 in a){a[$0]; print}'

How can I use awk (or sed for that matter, not perl) to accomplish:

sort <filename> | uniq -d
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Could do this (needn't sort it):

awk '{++a[$0]; if(a[$0] == 2) print}'
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didn't know you could do associative arrays. –  Jamie Jun 4 '12 at 13:48
    
@Jamie: This is although exactly what you use in your first example, even if you thought it was actually a set. –  Benoit Jun 4 '12 at 15:14
    
You're right, I reflected on that after seeing this post. –  Jamie Jun 7 '12 at 0:14

On a busybox system, you might need to save bytes. ;-)

awk ++a[\$0]==2
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you can still get rid of two spaces. –  Benoit Jun 4 '12 at 15:13
    
@Benoit: And the quotes. –  Dennis Williamson Jun 4 '12 at 15:17
    
and if you put alias a='awk ++a[\$0]==2' into your bashrc, you can get rid of all characters but one. :) –  Benoit Jun 4 '12 at 15:22

This might work for you:

# make some test data
seq 25 >/tmp/a
seq 3 3 25 >>/tmp/a
seq 5 5 25 >>/tmp/a
# run old command
sort -n /tmp/a | uniq -d
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# run sed command 
sort -n /tmp/a | 
sed ':a;$bb;N;/^\([^\n]*\)\(\n\1\)*$/ba;:b;/^\([^\n]*\)\(\n\1\)*/{s//\1/;P};D' 
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