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Let's say I want to write a small program that we can give it a .CS file and it can compile it for us and say if there are any compilation erors or not. So I used CodeDom for this. When I want to use CodeDOM I have to add the DLL names so that I can load them at run time. something like this:

    CompilerParameters parameters = new CompilerParameters();
    parameters.ReferencedAssemblies.Add("System.dll");
    parameters.ReferencedAssemblies.Add("System.Windows.Forms.dll");

But there are some problems to this approach: How can I make sure I have imcluded all the necessary DLLs? Is it the only way? Are there better ways instead of adding these DLLs like this?

Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't need to hard-code anything. Imagine calling Add() in a loop, using DLL names that are read from a text file -- or found in a directory at runtime, for that matter. You have all the tools you need to write something very flexible.

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Using DLL names read from a file? Can you please explain it more? Thanks. –  Blake Jun 4 '12 at 14:25
    
The author of the .CS file might also supply a list of DLLs in a second file, one per line. Your program could read that file, and after reading each line, pass the read string to a call to Add(). –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Jun 4 '12 at 14:27
    
Oh I see...still it is like typing them...yes it is not hard coding them in source code...but still hard coding them somewhere else in a text file... Wondering if we can analyze the source code by some Reflection Magic and find out what DLLS are needed ans just add those at run time? –  Blake Jun 4 '12 at 14:30
2  
@BDotA: No, you cannot use "Reflection Magic". Reflection is not magic, and it only works after compilation is complete. You have a chicken-and-egg problem. Reflection does tell you what assembly contains each type, because the developer told the compiler what assemblies to use, and the compiler stored that information in the metadata. THERE IS NO MAGIC. –  Ben Voigt Jun 4 '12 at 14:37

If by hardcode you mean explicitly specifying the dlls to be included (Whether they come from text file or source file) then NO there isn't any way for CodeDom to figure out what libraries this source is using since a class with given name can exist in 'any' assembly. So you as the developer have to specify which assemblies you're referring to.

In your case if you're taking source as input, you can ask the inputer to specify referenced libraries too. You can't reliably guess them.

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"you can ask the inputer to specify referenced libraries too. " Could you please explain that part more. Thanks. –  Blake Jun 4 '12 at 14:27
    
@BDotA if the user of the program specifies the source file he can also in some text box type the assemblies that he is using in source. –  Hasan Khan Jun 4 '12 at 14:29
    
ah I see...nop unfortunately this is not an option for me..Wondering if we can analyze the source code by some Reflection Magic and find out what DLLS are needed ans just add those at run time? –  Blake Jun 4 '12 at 14:31

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