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I know there are many other posts related to the HTML::TableExtract module, but all of them have been at a much higher level than I understand at the moment. I have a very small table (3 rows, 5 columns) from an email and I want to scrape all the data in the second row. However, with my limited knowledge of Perl, I have been having a lot of trouble following documentation online.

The table looks like this:

Time      notspam    probablespam    likelyspam    spam
2012-05   10252205   62192           55995         3797710
Total     ""         ""              ""            ""

Here is the snippet of the code I am trying to parse. This is the second of the three rows:

<tr class=3DmailViewUnreadOdd>

<td  class=3DreportViewHeader align=3D"left">
=09
     2012-05
</td>
=20=20
=20=20=20=20
     <td align=3D'right' class=3D'mailViewRowReadEven'>
10252205
=20=20=20=20
</td>
=20=20
=20=20=20=20
     <td align=3D'right' class=3D'mailViewRowReadEven'>
62192
=20=20=20=20
</td>
=20=20
=20=20=20=20
     <td align=3D'right' class=3D'mailViewRowReadEven'>
55995
=20=20=20=20
</td>
=20=20
=20=20=20=20
     <td align=3D'right' class=3D'mailViewRowReadEven'>
3797710
=20=20=20=20
</td>
=20=20
</tr>

Here is what I have tried so far. I used an example on the HTML::TableExtract page and modified it to fit my needs. But it's not returning anything:

use HTML::TableExtract;
my $te = HTML::TableExtract->new(
    headers => [qw(notspam  probablespam  likelyspam  spam)]);
my $html = 'test.html';
$te->parse($html);
# Examine all matching tables
foreach $ts ($te->tables) {
    print "Table (", join(',', $ts->coords), "):\n";
    foreach $row ($ts->rows) {
        print join(',', @$row), "\n";
    }
}

I want to pull out the date (2012-05) and the numbers (10252205, 62192, 55995, 3797710) and store them in variables. Should I be extracting the data using depth and count arguments?

share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? –  Jack Maney Jun 4 '12 at 14:45
    
Well I was originally going to use HTML:Parse, but then found that I should be using HTML:TableExtract. I have tried using the depth and count, but I wasn't sure if I was doing it right. Honestly, I hate to be "that guy" on SO, but I really don't have much knowledge of Perl. I'm trying to piece everything together and learn as I go. I guess from what I have found is that the best way to pull the information is going to be to search by header, so I would be looking for "probablyspam, likelyspam, spam, etc". –  Devin Swenson Jun 4 '12 at 14:51

1 Answer 1

This works for your example data. (When run against a full email, it probably captures too much, but that's all I can do with only the partial HTML.)

use strictures;
use File::Slurp qw(read_file);
use MIME::QuotedPrint qw(decode_qp);
use Web::Query qw();

my $w = Web::Query->new_from_html(decode_qp read_file 'so10883053.html');
my @data = $w->find('.mailViewUnreadOdd > *')->text;
# (
#     " 2012-05 ",
#       10252205 ,
#          62192 ,
#          55995 ,
#        3797710
# )

Instead of messing around with manual email decoding as I showed in the code, you instead should use a very high-level parser such as Courriel.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your help daxim. The problem is that these numbers are going to change on a regular basis, so I need the data's location, not it's literal values. Sorry that I did not mention that. –  Devin Swenson Jun 4 '12 at 15:44
    
Then edit your question and be very specific about what you mean with "location". Explain how you would manually arrive at the solution from the example data. –  daxim Jun 4 '12 at 15:47

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