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I need a rather complicated regular expression that will select words with one space between them and that can include the '-' symbol in them, it should not however select continuous whitespace.

'KENEDY JOHN G JR E'                  'example'                 'D-54'

I have tried the following regular expression:

\'([\s\w-]+)\'

but it selects continuous whitespace which I don't want it to do.

I want the expression to select

'KENEDY JOHN G JR E'
'example'
'D-54'
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"rather complicated"? I think not. –  kevlar1818 Jun 4 '12 at 15:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Perhaps,

\'([\w-]+(?:\s[\w-]+)*)\'

?

EDIT

If leading/trailing dashes (on the word boundaries) are not allowed, this should read:

/\'(\w+(?:[\s-]\w+)*)\'/
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An expression like this should do it:

'[\w-]+(?:\s[\w-]+)*'
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Try this:

my $data = "'KENEDY JOHN G JR E'                  'example'                 'D-54'";

# Sets of
#     one or more word characters or dash
#     followed by an optional space
# enclosed in single quotes
#
# The outermost ()s are optional. There just
# so i can print the match easily as $1.
while ($data =~ /(\'([\w-]+\s?)+\')/g)
{
    print $1, "\n";
}

outputs

'KENEDY JOHN G JR E'
'example'
'D-54'
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Ooops! Sorry, you wanted a rather complicated regexp. This one may be too simple for you! :-) –  theglauber Jun 4 '12 at 14:52

Not sure if this applies to you, since you asked for a regex specifically. However, if you want strings separated by two or more whitespace or dashes, you can use split

use strict;
use warnings;
use v5.10;

my $str = q('KENEDY JOHN G JR E'               'example'              'D-54');
my @match = split /\s{2,}/, $str;
say for @match;

A regex with similar functionality would be

my @match = $str =~ /(.*?)(?:\s{2,}|$)/g;

Note that you'll need the edge case of finding end of line $.

The benefit of using split or the wildcard . is that you rely on whitespace to define your fields, not the content of the fields themselves.

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Your code actually works as is.

use feature qw( say );
$_ = "'KENEDY JOHN G JR E'         'example'         'D-54'";
say for /\'([\s\w-]+)\'/g;

output:

KENEDY JOHN G JR E
example
D-54

(Move the parens if you want the quotes too.)

I would simply use

my @data = /'([^']*)'/g;

If you have any validation to do, do it afterwards.

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