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Let's say I want to write a program that takes a C# source code file ( just one single .CS file, not anything complicated) and I want this program to analyze that source code and as the result tell me what .NET DLLs do I need for the methods that are used in that source file. Is this even technically possible?

so for example if in that source file there is only a Console.Writeline() method I want it to be able to tell me that "mscorlib.DLL" is needed.

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1  
For what purpose? –  jrummell Jun 4 '12 at 14:59
1  
shouldn't you be able to tell by reading the using directives? –  Nadir Sampaoli Jun 4 '12 at 14:59
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@nadirs: No. .NET namespaces have a many:many relationship with assemblies. For example, if you see using System.Collections.Generic;, what assembly (DLL) is needed? Not enough information there. –  Ben Voigt Jun 4 '12 at 15:00
    
@jrummell : for CodeDOM...to be able to load the necessary assemblies. –  Bohn Jun 4 '12 at 15:00
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@Jared: That looks at the build configuration in the project files, but he has just source code, no project files. –  Ben Voigt Jun 4 '12 at 15:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In order to do this you will essentially need to write a compiler. The only way to determine what DLL's are needed is to first determine what ever identifier / name in the source file binds to. Once you've established what names bind to then you can understand what DLLs are necessary (assuming there is a DLL list to choose from).

Understanding name binding though requires your program understand ...

  • C# syntax
  • Name binding rules
  • Overload resolution rules

In short, you need a compiler :)

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Thanks. How about this? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163641.aspx ? I haven't studied it yet but found it now with googling! –  Bohn Jun 4 '12 at 15:12
2  
@BDotA that program is looking at a compiled assembly. In a compiled assembly all names are fully qualified and already bound hence it becomes simply a problem of reference analysis vs. source code analylis –  JaredPar Jun 4 '12 at 15:14
    
Ah Ok Thanks for checking it out... –  Bohn Jun 4 '12 at 15:22

You can look at all the using lines to determine which namespaces are used, and then you could use reflection to determine which assemblies implement types in those namespaces, but there is not a one-to-one relationship (or even a one-to-many relationship) between namespaces and assemblies so, at best, it could only tell you which assemblies you might need, not just the ones you definitely need. Even to do that, you would need a list of every possible assembly you might want to consider so you would know which ones to analyze for namespaces via reflection.

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Consider the following example:

using A;
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Customer c = new Customer();
}

//AssemblyA.dll
namespace A { public class Customer { } }

//AssemblyB.dll
namespace A { public class Customer { } }

In this case there is no way to know which assembly is needed for the code sample. Ideally, you would want a list of assemblies to go with your code file, so you always know where to look for the types.

An error-prone solution for this problem could be to take the first assembly that matches a namespace/type combination, looking for all classes in the code file. But even in this case you can't be sure if you have the right one:

using A;
using B;
static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Customer c = new Customer();
}

//AssemblyA.dll
namespace A { public class Customer { } }
//AssemblyB.dll
namespace B { public class Customer { } }

I would always include a list of assemblies to reference when parsing code files like this.

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Excellent point. I don't know who voted you down, or why, but I felt obliged to offset the down-vote with a +1! –  Steven Doggart Jun 4 '12 at 15:15
    
yep thanks. Yeah I wanted to work on something with CodeDOM and compile files at runtime but I had to load assemblies in my source code first, so I was thinking if there is a way that at runtime by looking at the source code I can find the assemblies that are needed...which looks like there is no way ..so I may just inlude a bunch of famous assemblies –  Bohn Jun 4 '12 at 15:21

I don't know about CodeDOM, but the C# compiler (csc.exe) is smart enough to ignore assembly references that aren't needed, when it generates the final code.

So you can just enumerate assemblies (of the right architecture, please!) in the GAC, add all of them, and let the compiler sort it out.

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Last time I checked, CodeDom internally used csc.exe, so it should behave the same in this regard. –  svick Jun 4 '12 at 15:31

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