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I have an input date-time string:

2012-06-04 15:41:28

I would like to properly display it for various countries. For example, in Europe we have dd.MM.yyyy whereas US uses MM/dd/yyyy.

My current code is like this:

TextView timedate = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.report_date);
SimpleDateFormat curFormater = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd kk:mm:ss"); 
curFormater.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getDefault());
Date dateObj = curFormater.parse(my_input_string); 
timedate.setText(dateObj.toLocaleString());

But it doesn't work exactly as I want (I always get the "uniform" result like "Jun 4, 2012 3:41:28 PM", even on my phone). What am I doing wrong?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

TextView timedate = (TextView) v.findViewById(R.id.report_date);
SimpleDateFormat curFormater = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd kk:mm:ss"); 
curFormater.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getDefault());
Date dateObj = curFormater.parse(my_input_string);

int datestyle = DateFormat.SHORT; // try also MEDIUM, and FULL
int timestyle = DateFormat.MEDIUM;
DateFormat df = DateFormat.getDateTimeInstance(datestyle, timestyle, Locale.getDefault());

timedate.setText(df.format(dateObj)); // ex. Slovene: 23. okt. 2014 20:34:45
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The simplest way to get the current date in current locale (device locale!) :

String currentDate = DateFormat.getDateInstance().format(Calendar.getInstance().getTime());

If you want to have the date in different styles use getDateInstance(int style):

DateFormat.getDateInstance(DateFormat.FULL).format(Calendar.getInstance().getTime());

Other styles: DateFormat.LONG, DateFormat.DATE_FIELD, DateFormat.DAY_OF_YEAR_FIELD, etc. (use CTRL+Space to see all of them)

If you need the time too:

String currentDateTime = DateFormat.getDateTimeInstance(DateFormat.DEFAULT,DateFormat.LONG).format(Calendar.getInstance().getTime());
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Did you try this variant:

   SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat(format, Locale.US);
   System.err.format("%30s %s\n", format, sdf.format(new Date(0)));
   sdf.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("UTC"));

Got it from documentation. I mean using format() method.

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This isn't working. Where'd you get System.err?? It's Android. –  Primož 'c0dehunter' Kralj Jun 4 '12 at 17:55
    
It was just a sample, where I show you using of SimpleDateFormat methods. You need to use format() method to get wishful behavior. –  teoREtik Jun 5 '12 at 11:26
    
I know about format() function. What I don't know is how to detect current locale (e.g. US or Europe) to format it properly. –  Primož 'c0dehunter' Kralj Jun 5 '12 at 11:34
    
Locale.getDefault() –  teoREtik Jun 5 '12 at 11:39

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