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Can anyone explain why isn't this possible (at least in .Net 2.0):

public class A<T>
{
    public void Method<U>() where U : T
    {
        ...
    }
}

...

A<K> obj = new A<K>();
obj.Method<J>();

with K being the superclass of J

EDIT

I've tried to simplify the problem in order to make the question more legible, but I've clearly overdo that. Sorry!

My problem is a little more specific I guess. This is my code (based on this):

public class Container<T>
{
    private static class PerType<U> where U : T
    {
        public static U item;
    }

    public U Get<U>() where U : T
    {
        return PerType<U>.item;
    }

    public void Set<U>(U newItem) where U : T
    {
        PerType<U>.item = newItem;
    }
}

and I'm getting this error:

Container.cs(13,24): error CS0305: Using the generic type Container<T>.PerType<U>' requires2' type argument(s)

share|improve this question
4  
It is possible in 4.0. Not very useful, because you do not use the type parameter in the signature, but definitely possible. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 4 '12 at 17:16
2  
It does work, even in .NET 2.0. –  Park Young-Bae Jun 4 '12 at 17:20
    
You are absolutely right, I have edited the question. Sorry. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 17:40
    
Even after edit, the code works perfectly fine. –  Park Young-Bae Jun 4 '12 at 17:44
    
Well, I definitely get the error above. This happens inside Unity which uses Mono compiler. I don't know if it might have something to do with it. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 18:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Actually it is possible. This code compiles and runs just fine:

public class A<T>
{
    public void Act<U>() where U : T
    {
        Console.Write("a");
    }
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  A<IEnumerable> a = new A<IEnumerable>();
  a.Act<List<int>>();
}

What is not possible is using covariance / contravariance in generics, as explained here:

IEnumerable<Derived> d = new List<Derived>();
IEnumerable<Base> b = d;
share|improve this answer
    
You are right, I have edited the question. Sorry. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 17:40
    
still, it compiles and works (of course U Item will remain a null at all times - you didnt provide a way to initialize your PertTyp class / its item field) –  YavgenyP Jun 4 '12 at 17:45
    
Please check my latest comment to my question. The initialization is supposed to be done by calling the Set method. obj.Set<J>(jObj) The PerType class should be static. I've removed it while debugging. I've edited the question to add the keyword again. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 18:20
    
it still works.. maybe you should provide ur entire complete code? –  YavgenyP Jun 4 '12 at 18:28
    
This is my entire code. There is really nothing more. I've started a new Unity project with just this Class and it gives the same error. Maybe it is a Mono or Unity specific error. I'll try to test it in other platforms. Thanks for your help. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 18:33

It works for me (VS 2008).

Do you have a problem with a class visibility? (class not public, wrong namespace)

Which error message are you getting?


UPDATE

Given your implementation of Container<T> I can write

class A { }
class B : A { }

class Test
{
    public void MethodName( )
    {
        var obj = new Container<A>();
        obj.Set(new B());
    }
}

This works perfectly. Are you sure that B derives from A? Note that for instance List<B> does NOT derive from List<A> (see YavgenyP's answer).


The error message could be a hint, telling you that there exists another Container<T> in another namespace requiring a second type argument for PerType<U, X??? >.

share|improve this answer
    
This should be a comment rather than an answer. –  Paul Sasik Jun 4 '12 at 17:24
    
You are right, I have edited the question. Sorry. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 17:39
    
This is probably a bug with Mono compiler or Unity. I've asked this same question in their Q&A system. Currently I have no way to test this (I will check it tomorrow at the office), but it seems to be a problem with the compiler: answers.unity3d.com/questions/262475/… Thanks for your insight though. –  andresp Jun 4 '12 at 21:23
    
I've just confirmed it. adding the "Container<T>." prefix solves the problem. it should be caused by some bug in Mono C# compiler. –  andresp Jun 5 '12 at 9:07

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