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I understand what weak tables are.
But I'd like to know where weak tables can be used practically?

The docs say

Weak tables are often used in situations where you wish to annotate values without altering them.

I don't understand that. What does that mean?

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Since Lua doesn't know what you consider garbage, it won't collect anything it isn't sure to be garbage. In some situations (one of which could be debugging) you want to specify a value for a variable without causing it to be considered "not trash" by Lua. From my understanding, weak tables allow you to do what you'd normally do with variables/objects/etc, but if they're weak referenced (or in a weak table), they will still be considered garbage by Lua and collected when the garbage collection function is called. –  rownage Jun 4 '12 at 17:58
    
@rownage Thanks for the info! In some situations you said. Can you specify such situations? –  SatheeshJM Jun 4 '12 at 18:01
    
Think about if you wanted to use an associative array, with key/value pairs in two separate private tables. If you only wanted to use the key table for one specific use, once you are done using it, it will be locked into existence in Lua. If you were to use a weak table, however, you'd be able to collect it as garbage as soon as you were done using it, freeing up the resources it was using. –  rownage Jun 4 '12 at 18:09
    
Ah frees up resources now n then! Makes sense. And what does this mean Weak tables are often used in situations where you wish to annotate values without altering them. ? And BTW. If you can post this an answer, I'd accept it :) –  SatheeshJM Jun 4 '12 at 18:13
    
ok, will post as an answer! –  rownage Jun 4 '12 at 18:18
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Posted as an answer from comments...

Since Lua doesn't know what you consider garbage, it won't collect anything it isn't sure to be garbage. In some situations (one of which could be debugging) you want to specify a value for a variable without causing it to be considered "not trash" by Lua. From my understanding, weak tables allow you to do what you'd normally do with variables/objects/etc, but if they're weak referenced (or in a weak table), they will still be considered garbage by Lua and collected when the garbage collection function is called.

Example: Think about if you wanted to use an associative array, with key/value pairs in two separate private tables. If you only wanted to use the key table for one specific use, once you are done using it, it will be locked into existence in Lua. If you were to use a weak table, however, you'd be able to collect it as garbage as soon as you were done using it, freeing up the resources it was using.

To explain that one cryptic sentence about annotating, when you "alter" a variable, you lock it into existence and Lua no longer considers it to be garbage. To "annotate" a variable means to give it a name, number, or some other value. So, it means that you're allowed to give a variable a name/value without locking it into existence (so then Lua can garbage collect it).

Translation:

Weak tables are often used in situations where you wish to give a name to a value without locking the value into existence, which takes up memory.

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Normally, storing a reference to an obect will prevent that object from being reclaimed when the object goes out of scope. Weak references do not prevent garbage collection.

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