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I have 3 views, ViewA contains a collection of ViewB children, and each ViewB contains a collection of ViewC children.

ViewA: Backbone.View.extend({
  viewBChildren: [],
  initialize: function() {
    // Do stuff
    var self = this;
    // Generate children
    this.model.get("CollectionB").each(function(b) {
      var viewB = new ViewB({
        // set properties
      });
      self.viewBChildren.push(viewB);
      console.log(self.viewBChildren.length); // Prints out correctly
    });
  }
});

ViewB: Backbone.View.extend({
  viewCChildren: [],
  initialize: function() {
    var self = this;
    this.model.get("CollectionC").each(function (c) {
      var viewC = new ViewC({
        // Set properties      
      });
      self.viewCChildren.push(viewC);
      console.log(self.viewCChildren.length); // Prints out a running total
    });
  }
});

So if I have 5 items in CollectionB, I would expect viewBChildren.length to also be 5. This is true and works fine.

My problem is when printing out viewCChildren.length. If each item in CollectionB had 5 children, I would expect it to print out 5 five times. Instead it prints out a running total, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25.

No other code touches these child collections, and no other method modifies it as of yet. The two calls in the initialize methods of my views are the only thing that affect collections.

I have the feeling I have a scope problem, but I can't see what I did wrong. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
I think your console statement is not having scope self, try to call console as console.log(self.viewCChildren.length); –  Naren Sisodiya Jun 4 '12 at 18:03
    
@NarenSisodiya, sorry that was actually an error I made while anonymizing the code. The actual code does include the self. –  Brandon Jun 4 '12 at 18:06
    
A working jsFiddle would be helpful –  fguillen Jun 4 '12 at 18:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The properties that you define in the View:

var V = Backbone.View.extend({
    p: [ ],
    ...
});

are not deep-copied to the instances, they're left attached to V's prototype and are thus shared between V and all of its instances.

With that in mind, we can see what's going on. Every time you do this:

self.viewCChildren.push(viewC);

you're actually doing ViewB.prototype.viewCChildren.push(viewC) and that's why you get a running total.

For example, if we do this (http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/Z3QC6/):

var V = Backbone.View.extend({
    a: [ ],
    initialize: function() {
        this.a.push('pancakes');
    }
});

// The setTimeouts are to kludge around the asynchronous nature
// of some console.logs. Play with the times if you're seeing
// two element arrays for all the console.log calls.
var v1, v2;
console.log(V.prototype.a);
setTimeout(function() {
    v1 = new V();
    console.log(v1.a);
    console.log(V.prototype.a);
}, 100);
setTimeout(function() {
    v2 = new V();
    console.log(v1.a);
    console.log(v2.a);
    console.log(V.prototype.a);
}, 500);

then we'll get this in the console:

[]
["pancakes"]
["pancakes"]
["pancakes", "pancakes"]
["pancakes", "pancakes"]
["pancakes", "pancakes"]

rather than the

[]
["pancakes"]
[]
["pancakes"]
["pancakes"]
[]

that you're probably expecting.

If you want to use an array as a view instance property, you should set it in initialize:

initialize: function() {
    this.viewCChildren = [ ];
}

For example, this (http://jsfiddle.net/ambiguous/BjCvf/):

var V = Backbone.View.extend({
    a: [ ],
    initialize: function() {
        this.a = [ ];
        this.a.push('pancakes');
    }
});
// The rest as above

will produce this console output:

[]
["pancakes"]
[]
["pancakes"]
["pancakes"]
[]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the excellent explanation. You've saved me a lot of grief now, and probably a whole lot more in the future. –  Brandon Jun 4 '12 at 19:41

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