Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have three 3 (jquery) tabs:

  • Overview
  • Pricing
  • Destination info

Each of these tabs have entirely different data. I can specify a URL in the href to make an AJAX call. However, how do I handle the data received for each of these tabs (so that I can render them depending on the context) ?

Should I use the load event to manipulate data ? If so, how can I get a handle on the returned json data in the load event ?

share|improve this question
    
I use the inspector that comes with WebKit browsers (mostly with Chrome, you have to enable it specially in Safari) to debug my JavaScript and look at exactly what is in a variable. Implement the load handler, place a breakpoint in the function, then use the inspector to tell me what exists in the variable (it will show you all of it's parameters, event.somethings, etc). –  FireLizzard Jun 4 '12 at 18:35
    
@FireLizzard Yes, that's how I develop myself. I'm a backend dev, so have a hard time figuring out the front end details, but inspector saves the day for me. As for the load function, I don't know how to get the handle on returned json data for a given tab. The only way I know is to handle the returned json data in success event handler. but then I don't have a reference of the selected tab in there. –  brainydexter Jun 4 '12 at 18:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have little experience with jQuery UI, but I know you can get data from an AJAX request as JSON (here):

$.ajax({
  url: "http://example.com/page.html",
  dataType: "json",
}).done(function ( data ) {
  // Do some stuff with the data
});

Or you could use jQuery.getJSON. Then there is always jQuery.parseJSON.

EDIT: As far as I can figure out, this is the best you're going to get:

$(window).load(function(){
    $(function() {
        $( "#tabs" ).tabs({
            ajaxOptions: {
                error: function( xhr, status, index, anchor ) {
                    $( anchor.hash ).html(
                        "Couldn't load this tab. We'll try to fix this as soon as possible. " +
                        "If this wouldn't be a demo." );
                },
                success: function( jsonObject, status ) {
                        // Code
                },
                dataType: "json"
            }
        });
    });
});

With this, the json would need to include the tab you were working with. This would make for a rather inelegant solution, as you will have to switch on the tab value returned from the json. It seems as though the tab API is not meant for anyone to handle the display process themselves. I see three other options: redo the tab API yourself; hack the API to do your thing; or do something like get_tab_contents.php?tabid=someid&json=somepath

share|improve this answer
    
Sure thing you can load data using AJAX/JSON. My concern is with handling the returned data. If I specify the success function on ajaxOptions, then how do I know who sent the request, and which tab to update –  brainydexter Jun 4 '12 at 18:32
    
Can you, or would it be impractical to, implement a different function for each tab? Also, as far as I know, the ajax.done(func) serves the same purpose as success in the ajaxOptions. –  FireLizzard Jun 4 '12 at 18:37
    
@Firelizzard due to the functionality of jquery ui tabs, it isn't possible to give each tab it's own success method. However, (@brainydexter), try console.log(this) within said success handler, it may have some information you can use such as the url that the data was requested from. –  Kevin B Jun 4 '12 at 18:42
    
@FireLizzard Same thing, done or success function are specified for all the tags. Look here: http://jqueryui.com/demos/tabs/#ajax. I need to know which tab was involved. –  brainydexter Jun 4 '12 at 18:43
    
@FireLizzard If I return the target tab data in my result, why do you think that is not going to work ? –  brainydexter Jun 5 '12 at 5:44

Maybe I'm reading this wrong but.... you could use a switch with some kind of flag set in your AJAX response.

/* 
  Your AJAX response could be something like:
  data.type = destination, overview, pricing etc
  data.content = The actual content you are expecting
*/
var data=/* Your ajax call */
switch(data.type)
{
 case 'destination':
      /* Handle the rest of the data object*/
      $('div').html(data.content);
      break;
 case 'overview':
      break;
 case 'pricing':
      break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm also exploring that chain of thought where the data type is being returned, but I believe there's got to be a cleaner way to deal with this. Also, do you think I could leverage the load event in any way ? –  brainydexter Jun 4 '12 at 18:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.