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I would like to write multiple functions in the same Python module, each of which is a separate profiling test using timeit, so that I can use command line argument to specify which one to run. A naive example (profiling.py) would be:

import sys
import timeit

def foo():

    setup = """
    import random
    """

    foo_1 = """
    for i in range(1000):
        random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)
    """

    foo_2 = """
    for i in range(1000):
        random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)
    """

    foo_3 = """
    for i in range(1000):
        random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)
    """

    print 'foo_1', timeit.Timer(foo_1, setup).timeit(1000)
    print 'foo_2', timeit.Timer(foo_2, setup).timeit(1000)
    print 'foo_3', timeit.Timer(foo_3, setup).timeit(1000)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if (len(sys.argv) > 1):
        if (sys.argv[1] == 'foo'):
            foo()
    else:
        print 'Which profiling do you want to run?'
        print 'available:'
        print '    foo'

However, when I try python profiling.py foo, I get error like the following:

foo_1
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "profiling.py", line 32, in <module>
    foo()
  File "profiling.py", line 25, in foo
    print 'foo_1', timeit.Timer(foo_1, setup).timeit(1000)
  File "/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/lib/python2.7/timeit.py", line 136, in __init__
    code = compile(src, dummy_src_name, "exec")
  File "<timeit-src>", line 6
    _t0 = _timer()
                 ^
IndentationError: unindent does not match any outer indentation level

I have searched for the usual space/tab indention error in the code, but didn't find any. Hence I wonder if it is because I wrap a timeit test inside a function, and this is not allowed?

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1  
What happens if you remove the whitespace from the strings you are passing to timeit? (e.g. foo_1="for i in range(1000):\n random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)") –  mgilson Jun 4 '12 at 19:31
    
Did you by any chance copy and paste that line? A lot of the times when you copy and paste you will encounter that error due to mismatched tab sizes or tabs as white-spaces. –  Florin Stingaciu Jun 4 '12 at 19:34
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This works:

import sys
import timeit

def foo():

    setup = """
import random
"""

    foo_1 = """
for i in range(1000):
    random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)
"""

    foo_2 = """
for i in range(1000):
    random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)
"""

    foo_3 = """
for i in range(1000):
    random.randint(0, 99) + random.randint(0, 99)
"""

    print 'foo_1', timeit.Timer(foo_1, setup).timeit(1000)
    print 'foo_2', timeit.Timer(foo_2, setup).timeit(1000)
    print 'foo_3', timeit.Timer(foo_3, setup).timeit(1000)

if __name__ == '__main__':
    if (len(sys.argv) > 1):
        if (sys.argv[1] == 'foo'):
            foo()
    else:
        print 'Which profiling do you want to run?'
        print 'available:'
        print '    foo'

The problem is that your strings that you're passing as setup and foo_1, etc. are indented since you've lined them up with your indented code inside the function. However, when that string gets executed by timeit, it raises the indentation error you see because the code should not be indented. This is essentially the same thing that would happen if you tried...

exec("    import sys")

as the first thing in your interactive interpreter session.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the suggestion. So I can fix the error by doing setup = """import random"""(all in one line), without making any change to foo_1. I wonder why? –  MLister Jun 4 '12 at 19:43
    
timeit must do some "cleanup" on the argument to be run, but not on the setup-code. –  mgilson Jun 4 '12 at 19:45
    
@MLister What's funny about that? You don't have any indentation in front of your setup code -- only a newline (blank lines are perfectly acceptable in python). –  mgilson Jun 4 '12 at 19:56
    
ooops, sorry I misunderstood your point. thanks for pointing out. –  MLister Jun 4 '12 at 19:59
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