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I just wrote a simple linked list, however when iterating through the list via add() and display() the program seg faults.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

typedef struct entry {
    void *value;
    struct entry *next;
} entry;

typedef struct list {
    entry *items;
} list;

list *create(void) {
    list *l;

    l = malloc (sizeof(list));
    l->items = malloc(sizeof(entry*));
    l->items->next = NULL;

    return l;
}

void add(list *l, void *value) {
    entry *temp, *last, *new;

    for (temp = l->items; temp != NULL; temp = temp->next) {
        last = temp;
    }

    new = malloc(sizeof(*new));

    new->value = value;
    new->next = NULL;

    last->next = new;
}

void display(list *l) {
    entry *temp;

    for (temp = l->items; temp != NULL; temp = temp->next) {
        printf("%s\n", temp->value);
    }
}

int main(void) {
    list *l = create();

    add(l, "item1");
    add(l, "item2");
    add(l, "item3");
    add(l, "item4");

    display(l);

    return 0;
}

I have tested the code on a few machines and it works on a few and doesn't on others. I'm clueless about the source of the error.

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3  
1) run it in a debugger and tell us where it segfaults; 2) you never check the return value from malloc, so it smells to me like "on some machines i have enough memory on others i do not" always check for failure conditions from function calls which can fail always yes, you too no, you're not special just do it –  tbert Jun 4 '12 at 19:42
2  
l->items = malloc(sizeof(entry*));l->items->next = NULL; Your allocating a pointer and assign to where it points at. –  wildplasser Jun 4 '12 at 19:43
    
The first think I would do is use a better compiler. This would not only help you pinpoint this error, but future errors. If I compile this code in gcc, without verbose error flags I get 24 errors. –  jedwards Jun 4 '12 at 19:47
    
This is just pseudocode, I'm aware of the possibility that malloc may fail. However, there is sufficient memory. Segmentation fault occurs by iterating through the list (every for loop) as the title of this thread states. –  thpetrus Jun 4 '12 at 19:49
    
It is not about malloc failing. It is about malloc()ing a pointer_to_object and treating it as if it were an object. BTW: the struct list is not needed in the design, and only confusing. –  wildplasser Jun 4 '12 at 19:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In addition to the wrong size passed to malloc that FatalError mentioned, you allocate memory for l->items

list *create(void) {
    list *l;

    l = malloc (sizeof(list));
    l->items = malloc(sizeof(entry*));
    l->items->next = NULL;

    return l;
}

but don't ever set l->items->value to anything, so it's an uninitialised pointer and when you try to dereference it when printing

void display(list *l) {
    entry *temp;

    for (temp = l->items; temp != NULL; temp = temp->next) {
        printf("%s\n", temp->value);
    }
}

in the first iteration of the loop, that can easily lead to a segfault even if the insufficient allocation size didn't cause one before.

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This does not allocate sufficient space:

l->items = malloc(sizeof(entry*));

It should be sizeof(entry), or if you want to follow the pattern that you use elsewhere:

l->items = malloc(sizeof(*l->items));

As a result, you're currently trampling memory.

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FatalError already found the problem and published a solution. I would like to add that a better approach than asking such a specific question would be to debug your code.

valgrind is a Linux tool that allows debugging memory management. All you need to do is run the tool with your application and look in its output for errors.

If you run you application with "./myapp", you just need to run:

# valgrind -v --leak-check=full --show-reachable=yes ./myapp
share|improve this answer
    
+1, valgrind is awesome and would have caught this straight away. –  FatalError Jun 4 '12 at 20:00
    
Thank you, really appreciate it. –  thpetrus Jun 4 '12 at 20:01

To proof that you don't need the list structure, since it only carries a "head" pointer (I renamed the original entry to llist, end dropped the list and the typedefs):

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

struct llist {
    char *value;
    struct llist *next;
};

void add(struct llist **ll, void *value) {

      /* find the end of the list;
      ** keeping a pointer to the (final NULL) pointer.
      ** If this function is called with the first argument pointing to
      ** a NULL pointer (the empty list),
      ** this loop will iterate zero times.
      */
    for ( ; *ll != NULL; ll = &(*ll)->next) {;}

    *ll = malloc(sizeof(**ll));

    (*ll)->value = value;
    (*ll)->next = NULL;

}

void display(struct llist *l) {

    for (; l != NULL; l = l->next) {
        printf("%s\n", l->value);
    }
}

int main(void) {
    struct llist *l = NULL;

    add(&l, "item1");
    add(&l, "item2");
    add(&l, "item3");
    add(&l, "item4");

    display(l);

    return 0;
}
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