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Ok, I leaned html & css back in 2001. I was used to do something like this (To create a website with a "vertical-column" layout):

<html>
<head>
    <title>Vertical-column layout</title>
</head>
<body>
<table id="doc" >
<!-- header -->
    <tr>
    <td id="header" colspan="3"><!-- header code/php include --></td>
    </tr>
<!-- / header -->

<!-- / content -->
    <tr>
    <td id="col1" name="menu"><!-- content code/php include --></td>
    <td id="col2" name="content_left"><!-- content code/php include --></td>
    <td id="col3" name="content_right"><!-- content code/php include --></td>
    </tr>
<!-- / content -->

<!-- footer -->
    <tr>
    <td id="footer" colspan="3"><!-- header code/php include --></td>
    </tr>
<!-- / footer -->
</table>
</body>
</html>

Easy, everything is automatically aligned the way I want, no css headache etc. Life was good back then. HOWEVER, not so long ago, I read that this approach should no longer be used. I was going to try a new way using a bunch of div's, but w3c & w3c's validation does not like you using block elements as inline elements...WTF!!!

So...my frustration lead me to ask you guys:

HOW? How to accomplish something like this in "modern way"...as easy as possible? Does html 5 has a better way?
WHY? Why is it that now we should not use this table approach to get a "vertical column layout" on a website?

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My take is: if w3c and such are going to come up with these "rules" and changes, they should also provide a COMPATIBLE & cross-browser solution to the changes they make. –  Omar Jun 4 '12 at 20:53
    
Float's are a headache for me and don't get along well. They have really weird behaviors. They are not straight-forward like block elements. How do I prevent these float problems so that I can start to feel more confident on using float's? -As of now, I avoid them 100% since I can't control their weirdness. For example, they tend to overlap, change positions one on top of another, appear in locations where they should not be, etc, etc... –  Omar Jun 4 '12 at 22:14
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Below is a basic grid I cobbled together you can use with any size website. You'll need to clear the floats on the columns with either overflow hidden or a clearfix. If your project doesn't need to support IE7 you can use box-sizing border-box to add padding to your columns, otherwise add an extra element inside each column for padding.

Whilst I can appreciate that making columns was super easy with tables that was pretty much the only thing they were better for layout wise.

HTML:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>

    <header></header>

    <div class="content grid">
        <div id="col1" class="col s1of3"></div>
        <div id="col2" class="col s1of3"></div>
        <div id="col3" class="col s1of3"></div>
    </div>

    <footer></footer>

</body>
</html>

CSS:

.grid {
}
    .grid .col { float: left; }

    .grid .col.s1of1 { width: 100%; }
    .grid .col.s1of2 { width: 50%; }
    .grid .col.s1of3 { width: 33.33333333%; }
    .grid .col.s2of3 { width: 66.66666666%; }
    .grid .col.s1of4 { width: 25%; }
    .grid .col.s3of4 { width: 75%; }
    .grid .col.s1of5 { width: 20%; }
    .grid .col.s2of5 { width: 40%; }
    .grid .col.s3of5 { width: 60%; }
    .grid .col.s4of5 { width: 80%; }
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This is very similar to OOCSS. Nice! –  DACrosby Feb 28 '13 at 19:56
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HOW?

Option 1: Google 'CSS 3 column layout'. This is has been well covered over the past 6 years or so and there's gobs of tutorials out there.

Option 2: Google 'CSS Framework' and pick one to build your layout. 960.gs is a popular one.

WHY?

Ideally, you'd use tables for tabular data and css to layout the rest of the page. Why? Well, in theory, CSS gives you a lot more flexibility. The best example is probably when it comes to responsive web design. On an iPhone, I may want 2 columns. On my iPad, I may want 4 columns. That can all be done with CSS, but gets really complicated if you hard-wire the HTML using tables.

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another good reason is purely for accessability and search results. Readers for visually impaired users have a very hard time when they encounter tables making it difficult for visually impaired users to use the site. Google is pretty much visually impaired as well when it comes to building search results. If you use table layouts you may find your site much lower on their search results than it should be. Two other things to keep in mind. –  Tony318 Jun 4 '12 at 20:02
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CSS3 has some neat column layout options, but they're not very good compatability-wise, and a fair number of the options aren't supported by a large number of browsers.

If you're seeking to make columns of variable/fixed width, then this is probably the article you're looking for:

http://www.alistapart.com/articles/holygrail

Using this method, you can set one or more divs to a fixed width, while having another resize appropriately to fill the page.

If you just want all your columns to resize, then just make them all float: left, and width: {percentage of page}%

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In the case of fix sized columns. Say, 2 columns, id="content_left" style="width: 500px" and id="content_right" style="width: 300px"? Also, should I use span's or div's ej: <span id="content_left> or <div id="content_left>? –  Omar Jun 4 '12 at 20:55
    
If you want a 500px div in the left, and 300px one on the right, then yes. And span is for defining a small style around text (eg, making it a different colour) where as div is for containing a block of content, so div is what you'd use. –  Death Jun 4 '12 at 21:00
    
One last thing...float's are a headache for me and does not get along well. They have really weird behaviors. They are not straight-forward like block elements. How do I prevent these float problems so that I can start to feel more confident on using float's? -As of now, I avoid them 100% since I can't control their weirdness. For example, they tend to overlap, change positions one on top of another, appear in locations where they should not be, etc, etc...I see float as the "black sheep" of the css family –  Omar Jun 4 '12 at 21:20
    
float is perhaps the primary tool of most CSS layouts. Hunker down and give them a try. ;) –  DA. Jun 5 '12 at 1:27
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