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Does the amount of memory that my app take up physically, as in, on a hard drive, have any relationship to the amount of memory it takes up when running? For instance, say, my Background.caf file takes up 4.9 megabytes of space on the disk, when being run on the iPhone, is exactly 4.9 megabytes being allocated for my music? Similarly, if my graphics take up 20 megabytes of space, will the amount of memory on the iPhone, being used to store and access these graphics be equivalent to 20 megabytes? This is important because I want to know if the size of the files that I'm working with right now, will have a large impact on performance. Thank you!

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You've got audio, image, database, etc, files that do not occupy "RAM", except momentarily and usually not all at once. –  Hot Licks Jun 4 '12 at 20:33

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Does the amount of memory that my app take up physically, as in, on a hard drive, have any relationship to the amount of memory it takes up when running?

No, absolutely not. Otherwise Autodesk would quickly go out of business!

when being run on the iPhone, is exactly 4.9 megabytes being allocated for my music?

No, music is not loaded into memory all at once, it is sent in chunks, streams, or decompressed in real time, but never is the whole thing present in memory.

Similarly, if my graphics take up 20 megabytes of space, will the amount of memory on the iPhone, being used to store and access these graphics be equivalent to 20 megabytes

It depends. UIImages are loaded on demand and cached depending on the method called (e.g. +imageNamed: is cached, and +imageWithContentsOfFile: is not), however, PNG resources always occupy slightly more memory than their file size because Xcode runs a series of optimizations and compressions before they are loaded into the bundle. Caching an image does increase the overall memory footprint slightly, however, it leads to faster image loading as UIImage doesn't have to seek it out on the disk again.

And this again changes with JPEG images, which have a famous file-format specific lossy compression mechanism, allowing them to be much smaller on the disk, but massive in memory.

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Awesome! Love your answer! Thank you! –  WayWay Jun 5 '12 at 19:59

audio files are loaded as streams, they will not occupy 20M of the memory of the app For image files am not sure, but i still know that ios caches the images that you load with the application so i am unable to give you exact information about the images

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