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I don't exactly get the concept. Are they a set of api's to a library that accesses the hardware. If so is it possible for someone to create a brand new api like opengl and directx?

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You should read this post: programmers.stackexchange.com/a/88055 and maybe this one: blog.wolfire.com/2010/01/…) – Samuel Gosselin Jun 4 '12 at 20:47
    
And this series of blog posts by Ryg is also very informative. – Bart Jun 4 '12 at 20:50
    
@SamuelGosselin: And yet, neither one of those actually answers his question. He's asking about the relationship between the APIs and the hardware. – Nicol Bolas Jun 4 '12 at 21:09
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The purpose of graphics API like OpenGL or DirectX is to provide a single graphics API to use across a wide range of hardware. In fact, a large portion of these APIs are actually implemented in the graphics drivers. If you were to design your own graphics API you would either have to make it run on almost entirely on the CPU ("in software") or to write special code for each type of graphics card you wanted to support.

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thanx for the answer :) – Belos Jun 28 '12 at 12:10

is it possible for someone to create a brand new api like opengl and directx?

Yep. Just create a new Gallium state tracker.

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Of course, that would only work for Linux. Also, it seems to have fallen into disuse. – Nicol Bolas Jun 4 '12 at 21:11
    
@NicolBolas: Gallium is the new Mesa architecture and all the Open Source drivers are slowly migrated to it. However so far they are still bug ridden. – datenwolf Jun 5 '12 at 5:50

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