Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get a page with AJAX, but when I get that page and it includes Javascript code - it doesn't execute it.

Why?

Simple code in my ajax page:

<script type="text/javascript">
alert("Hello");
</script>

...and it doesn't execute it. I'm trying to use Google Maps API and add markers with AJAX, so whenever I add one I execute a AJAX page that gets the new marker, stores it in a database and should add the marker "dynamically" to the map.

But since I can't execute a single javascript function this way, what do I do?

Is my functions that I've defined on the page beforehand protected or private?

** UPDATED WITH AJAX FUNCTION **

function ajaxExecute(id, link, query)
{
    if (query != null)
    {
        query = query.replace("amp;", "");
    }

    if (window.XMLHttpRequest)
    {
        // code for IE7+, Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari
        xmlhttp=new XMLHttpRequest();
    }
    else
    {
        // code for IE6, IE5
        xmlhttp=new ActiveXObject("Microsoft.XMLHTTP");
    }

    xmlhttp.onreadystatechange=function()
    {
        if (xmlhttp.readyState==4 && xmlhttp.status==200)
        {
            if (id != null)
            {
                    document.getElementById(id).innerHTML=xmlhttp.responseText;
            }
        }
    }

    if (query == null)
    {
        xmlhttp.open("GET",link,true);
    }
    else
    {
        if (query.substr(0, 1) != "?")
        {
            xmlhttp.open("GET",link+"?"+query,true);
        }
        else
        {
            xmlhttp.open("GET",link+query,true);
        }
    }
    xmlhttp.send();
}

** Solution by Deukalion **

var content = xmlhttp.responseText;

if (id != null)
{

    document.getElementById(id).innerHTML=content;
    var script = content.match("<script[^>]*>[^<]*</script>");

    if (script != null)
    {
        script = script.toString().replace('<script type="text/javascript">', '');
        script = script.replace('</script>', '');
        eval(script);

    }
}

and on certain events, I had to within the script addevent listeners instead of just making a "select onchange='executeFunctionNotIncludedInAjaxFile();'" I had to addEventListener("change", functionName, false) for this. In the script that is being evaluated.

share|improve this question
2  
Please include an example of the code which makes the AJAX request and handles the response. –  Daniel Mendel Jun 4 '12 at 21:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you update your page by doing something like setting a container's innerHTML to some updated content, the browser simply will not run the scripts in it. You can locate the <script> tags, get their innerHTML (IE may prefer innerTEXT), and then eval() the scripts yourself (which is pretty much what jQuery does, though it finds the scripts with a regex before updating the DOM).

share|improve this answer
    
I was able to regex the scripts, so I can get only the scripts. Then I run eval at them, but it doesn't work with... say added DOM Elements that have scripts in them that reference main functions not loaded through AJAX. –  Deukalion Jun 4 '12 at 23:22
    
What if the server returned straight javascript? That would make eval a lot easier to use. (but beware of CSRF. ) –  Alexander Bird Jun 5 '12 at 0:29
    
Yes of course; if what you get back is pure JavaScript, then it's a different deal. And it is definitely important to understand the trust issues. –  Pointy Jun 5 '12 at 3:41

Use this function:

function parseScript(_source) {
    var source = _source;
    var scripts = new Array();

    // Strip out tags
    while(source.indexOf("<script") > -1 || source.indexOf("</script") > -1) {
        var s = source.indexOf("<script");
        var s_e = source.indexOf(">", s);
        var e = source.indexOf("</script", s);
        var e_e = source.indexOf(">", e);

        // Add to scripts array
        scripts.push(source.substring(s_e+1, e));
        // Strip from source
        source = source.substring(0, s) + source.substring(e_e+1);
    }

    // Loop through every script collected and eval it
    for(var i=0; i<scripts.length; i++) {
        try {
            eval(scripts[i]);
        }
        catch(ex) {
            // do what you want here when a script fails
        }
    }

    // Return the cleaned source
    return source;
}

then do parseScript(xmlhttp.responseText); when you're replacing/adding content.

share|improve this answer

In case some other people stumble upon this old thread, there is one issue with the accepted answer by Deukalion, there is one issue that may have been overlooked: as written, the script only looks for the first script tag. If multiple script tags exist, all others are overlooked.

A few minor tweaks would resolve the issue. Change one line from:

    var script = content.match("<script[^>]*>[^<]*</script>");

To:

    var script = content.match(/<script[^>]*>[^<]*<\/script>/g);

And another from:

    script = script.toString().replace('<script type="text/javascript">', '');

To:

    script = script.join("").replace(/<script type="text\/javascript">/g, '');

Now it will gather all the <script> code and execute them in the order found on the page. Otherwise it was an excellent solution.

share|improve this answer

After the AJAX request, you can make an "on success" function which can take the returned html and do something with it. Then something will be executed.

If there was a code example, then I could provide a code solution to the situation. But using just standard xmlhttprequest, the following could be done:

xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
xhr.open("GET","ajax_info.txt",true);
xhr.onreadystatechange=function()
{
if (xhr.readyState==4 && xhr.status==200)
  {
  document.getElementById("myDiv").innerHTML = xhr.responseText;
  }
}
xhr.send();
​
share|improve this answer
1  
HTML has a <script> tag ... –  Pointy Jun 4 '12 at 21:07
    
My method looks similiar, although I have a more dynamic ajax function. It works fine, except executing javascripts. I'll add the code to my post. –  Deukalion Jun 4 '12 at 22:37
    
@Deukalion, no problem, and I like the flexibility of your solution you posted in your question. P.S. If my answer was what helped, please upvote and/or check as answered. Thanks! :) –  Alexander Bird Jun 4 '12 at 22:56
    
No, it didn't. My php file included a simple "alert()" but it didn't execute it. And I can't reach functions staticly built when loading a page with Ajax. –  Deukalion Jun 4 '12 at 23:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.