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After using a myisam for years now with 3 indexes + around 500 columns for Mio of rows, I wonder how to "force" mongodb to store indexes in memory for fast-read performance.

In general, it is a simply structured table and all queries are WHERE index1=.. or index2=... or index3=.. (myisam) and pretty simple in mongodb as well. It's nice if mongodb is managing the index and ram on its own. However, I am not sure if it does and about the way mongodb can speed up these queries on indexs-only best.

Thanks

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2 Answers 2

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It's nice if mongodb is managing the index and ram on its own.

MongoDB does not manage the RAM at all. It uses Memory-Mapped files and basically "pretends" that everything is RAM all of the time.

Instead, the operating system is responsible for managing which objects are kept in RAM. Typically on a LRU basis.

You may want to check the sizes of your indexes. If you cannot keep all of those indexes in RAM, then MongoDB will likely perform poorly.

However, I am not sure if it does and about the way mongodb can speed up these queries on indexs-only best.

MongoDB can use Covered Indexes to retrieve directly from the DB. However, you have to be very specific about the fields returned. If you include fields that are not part of the index, then it will not return "index-only" queries.

The default behavior is to include all fields, so you will need to look at the specific queries and make the appropriate changes to allow "index-only". Note that these queries do not include the _id, which may cause issues down the line.

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a small correction maybe: 'MongoDB can use Covered Indexes to retrieve directly from the memory.' –  Sergiu Zaharie Jul 3 at 10:46
    
It's only kind of "memory" that index data you're seeking may not be in actual memory at the time of the query being issue. –  Gates VP Jul 3 at 22:10

You don't need to "force" mongo to store indices in memory. An index is brought in memory when you use it and then stays in memory until the OS kicks it out.

MongoDB will will automatically use covered index when it can.

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My default query which requires top performance (for read-only): db.largecollection.find( { $or : [ { identifierX : "sha1_hash123" } , { identifierY : "md5_hash456" } , { identifierZ : "another_hash789" } ] } ) insert/update can be delayed or quequed for my use-case. Sometimes there will also be other queries like .find({rarely_access_data:{...}}). Could such a query make the inmemory cache to be "flush" and slow down my regular queries? So I have to trust, that there is no other query trashing the index-in-memory and mongodb itself is the only instance which decides about this? –  ledy Jun 5 '12 at 7:29
    
The OS manages the memory not mongo so yes there is always a chance an inmemory cache might get flushed. –  Sid Jun 6 '12 at 16:59

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